Hydroponic System – Digital Farm Documentation

Date: March 16, 2017

Partner: Callum Amor

Instructor: Dan

For this project, we were partnered up and assigned to create a gravity drip, ebb and flow, or NFT hydroponic system that could house at least four plants, use a water pump and drains when full.

Cal and I started with a large styrofoam container we found in the cardboard room. The original idea was to create a fully portable hydroponic system with a lid. But shortly thereafter scrapped the lid idea and just went with a one component project. The styrofoam box we chose conveniently had pockets that could hold plants on the sides and a large reservoir in the middle. The pump would sit in the reservoir and pump water to the first side container, the water would then flow down lower and lower further into the other containers. A tube would then transfer the water to the other side, where the water would flow into the final container. While the water is flowing, it is drained slowly by holes in the side.

Measuring the box

IMG_20170310_102232

Testing the water flow

Creating holes for water drainage

IMG_20170314_170038

We quickly ran into problems when we tried to fill the main reservoir with water. We discovered that the styrofoam could not properly hold water. If we waited a short time the bottom of the box would start to leak. We thought of many fixes, one of them was to cover the entire bottom with wood glue. We finally settled with hot glueing a plastic wrap/bag to the bottom to keep it sealed. We also taped the bottom of the box excessively to keep it from leaking any further.

Leaks!

Lining the box with plastic wrap/bag

IMG_20170314_183155

Hot glueing the plastic on

IMG_20170314_183946

After we properly sealed the reservoir, we started to cut down the edges of each of the containers. It had to drain downwards like a downwards sloping river. We had to test it many times in order to get the right height for each container, but we eventually got it.

Testing with pump to find correct wall heights

IMG_20170314_191700

After finding the correct wall heights, we hot glued the tubing to the side wall. The problems with the styrofoam did not stop at the leaking. The styrofoam also melted when we tried to use hot glue. It did not melt a lot though so it was manageable.

Tube management 

IMG_20170315_172945

Tube insert into the other container

IMG_20170310_103755

The code for the project was very simple. It was just turning the pump on for 15 minutes (900000 milliseconds) and then back off for 15 minutes. It is shown below.

In the end the project worked just alright. It would not be the greatest hydroponics system, but it is still semi portable and could be improved in a lot of ways. One of the biggest downfalls to this project is the material we started with. The styrofoam was in no way designed to handle water. Using the styrofoam caused us to bump into many different problems.

int pumpPin = 3;

void setup() {

pinMode(pumpPin, OUTPUT);

}

void loop() {

digitalWrite(pumpPin, HIGH); 
delay(900000);
digitalWrite(pumpPin, LOW);
delay(900000);

}

Bomb Diffusing! – Interaction Lab 12 Documentation

Date: May 5th, 2017

Instructor: Marcela

Partner: Sjur

Material’s Used:

  • Arduino
  • Jumper Cables
  • Breadboard
  • USB Cable
  • 1x LED
  • 2x 10K Resistors
  • 1x Wire Cutters

For this lab we were assigned with using both Arduino and Processing to create a media controller. My partner Sjur and I decided to stray away and create something a little different than just a basic media controller. We decided to create a very simple bomb diffusing simulation. The circuitry is displayed below:

The Bomb!

IMG_20170505_120137

More jumper cables for added confusion!

IMG_20170505_122756

With our very limited time, the concept of the game was that the user would cut different wires on the breadboard until the bomb exploded. Antonius helped us create a simple physical switch with jumper cables and a resistor. So if the jumper cable was disconnected from the breadboard, or cut, the bomb would be activated. Only one of the jumper cables on our breadboard actually activated the bomb, but we put multiple other different jumper cables on there as decoys to the real thing.

When the bomb went off the processing would play a video I found and quickly edited using Adobe Premiere. In order to make it more realistic, we used a real wire cutter.

IMG_20170505_123734

Our lives are in your hands, Sjur…

Whirlpool Hydroponics – Digital Farm Final Project Documentation

Date: May 21st, 2017

Instructor: Dan

Materials Used:

  • Large Bowl
  • Small Bowl
  • Water Pump
  • Tubing
  • Arduino
  • Relay
  • Jumper Cables
  • USB Cable
  • Power Supply

For our final project, we were assigned with creating a “Plant Life Support System”. Following this prompt I wanted to create more of an aesthetic piece, not so much a technically and mechanically advanced piece. What I settled with was a whirlpool-styled hydroponics system. The concept of the piece was to have small plants such as Basil, to be resting in mesh pots and floating within a whirlpool. A water pump would spin the mesh pots and plants around. Where I got the inspiration for the project was from a night market in Tokyo, where they displayed apples for sale in a similar system. Below is a video:

Japanese Apple Whirlpool

 

When I first proposed the project I was planning on not having a pool, and having a canal for the plants to follow. But after presenting the project and getting feedback I realised that the water had to drain somewhere! Dan and a few people had suggested that I use a bubbler of some sort in order to do so. Keeping the original concept of an aesthetic piece in mind, I decided to just use an overflow system. Where when the first bowl fills up, the second one will take the overflow, and the pump will pump water back up to the first. This way the piece can perpetually flow.

After finding suitable sized bowls on Taobao and also mesh pots to hold my plants I began to create my project. For the first version of my project, I just taped the the pump to the bottom and then held the top bowl. It made a mess but showed that the concept would work.

First test

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Up close of first test

IMG_20170511_103738

After finding out that the concept was feasible. I simply used a lot of hot glue to glue the pump to the bottom of the bowl, and also glue the top of the bowl to the pump. It stayed in place very well even when the bowl was filled with water. I had to test out how much water the two bowls needed in order to function. I simply had to fill the top smaller bowl to the top and then fill the bottom bowl until the pump was completely submerged. Putting in the “minimum” amount of water also created a nice ambient water splashing sound when the water overflowed to the bottom bowl.

Test with foam blocks

Now that the flow of water was working. I had to find a way to keep the mesh pots afloat. I first thought of using styrofoam as it floats, but remembered that the hot glue would melt it. Also I felt it would be really difficult to cut the styrofoam in even blocks. I decided to settle with the bubbles from bubble wrap. It took a while I cut individual pieces out but it worked. Some of the bubbles also popped when it came in contact with the hot glue, but most of them stayed. I chose to put three each on the mesh pots. They worked very well in keeping the mesh pots afloat and stable.

The coding for the project was very, very simple. It was only turning the pump on and nothing else.

Final Project

Final Thoughts

I received a lot great feedback when presenting my project. Millie suggested that I should have just grabbed some plants that had already grown so I could display what it would actually look like once the plants had grown when I presented. Someone suggested that I could put more of the mesh pots inside so it wouldn’t look like it was going so fast. Dan suggested that I could 3D print a piece to go where the tubing enters the top bowl, so the mesh pots don’t get stuck as they sometimes do. Something that I would have liked to do was to laser cut the box that held my Arduino and wiring that went on the bottom of my piece. I tried to laser cut but it was very last minute and some fellows decided that it was too simple to laser cut a box and suggested I should just use a cardboard box. I looked for the nicest looking cardboard box and went with it.

In the end I am pretty happy with the outcome of my project. I felt maybe it a little bit too simple, but sometimes that is a good thing. I could imagine this piece resting at a reception or perhaps inside a spa somewhere.

int pumpPin = 3;

void setup() {

pinMode(pumpPin, OUTPUT);

}

void loop() {

digitalWrite(pumpPin, HIGH); 

}

Boxy – Interaction Lab Final Project Documentation

Date: May 21, 2017

Instructor: Marcela

Materials Used:

  • Arduino
  • Jumper cables
  • 10K big potentiometer
  • Infrared Ranger
  • Push Button
  • Light Sensor
  • Touch Sensor
  • USB Cable
  • Mini Breadboard
  • 2x 10K Resistors

For my final project, I wanted to create an interactive reaction-based game with multiple different inputs. I wanted to experiment with as many different sensors as I could, and also challenge my coding ability. I believe I am not a very strong coder, so I knew this project would be challenging for me.

My project is inspired by the children’s game “Bop It!”. The Bop It, shown below is an interactive reaction based game with four inputs. It has a twisting input, a pulling input, a button, and also a microphone. The game will prompt the user to perform an action, and the player only has a certain amount of time to complete it. As the user performs the actions successfully, the timer gets shorter and the game get’s more challenging.

“Bop It!”

The project that I created is inspired by this game. The difference is that the user will be prompted to perform their actions through processing. The other difference is that my project has multiple different inputs, such as a light sensor and an infrared ranger.

Hardware

I began my project by creating plans to laser cut a box with precise cut outs for the sensors. The box has six sides, so five sides had cutouts for the different sensors, and the final side had a cutout for the USB cable that would be connected to processing. Marcela suggested that I use www.makercase.com to create my box. After choosing the size of my box and the correct size of the screws I carefully measured the dimensions of the various sensors. To do this I used a calliper.

Calliper used to help measure potentiometer

IMG_20170511_172724

After measuring the dimensions of all the sensors, I used Adobe Illustrator to create the plans for the laser cut.

Laser Cutting!

 

It took a few tries to get the perfect cut as there was a problem with the sizing in Illustrator, and I had also measured 2 of the sensors wrong. But in the end the box was complete and I was ready to start attaching the sensors to the freshly laser-cut box.

Laser Cut Final Parts

IMG_20170511_192051

At first I was confused at how I would attach the sensors to the laser cut box because I thought hot glue would be unsafe for the sensors. Marcela assured me that hot glue was okay and could be removed easily. So I began to attach all the sensors to the laser cut box.

Touch Sensor attached to box

IMG_20170515_181417

Infrared Ranger attached to box

IMG_20170515_181422

A lot of the sensors I had to solder cables to certain parts, and they were too far from the mini breadboard I was using inside. Things like the light sensor and potentiometer had to have additional wires and soldering. Below is a picture of the soldering for the light sensor.

Soldering for light sensor

IMG_20170515_181426

After all the sensors were attached to the box and properly wired up I put them in the box and one by one tested to see if they were working properly. They worked properly and I sealed up the box using 20mm screws, nuts, and bolts.

Cuddled up inside the box

IMG_20170515_204209

Software

Now the challenging part, the coding. The Arduino portion of the coding was pretty simple. It was simply taking the input from each sensor and reading it. A challenging part of the coding was deciding how Arduino would send the input from each sensor to processing as there were 5 different sensors. Rudy helped me by directing me to a portion of code on the internet. This code was interesting, as it used the “print”, “println” functions and arrays in order to send the readings from every single sensor to processing at the same time. So the processing would be receiving the readings from the sensors continuously. Below is the portion of code that performs this process.

Arduino printing every state, last state using “println”

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 6.40.28 AM

Processing code to read for sensors from Arduino

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 6.48.08 AM

 Now for the timer that would record the amount of time the user had to complete his tasks, I created the code from scratch. I used the millis() function in processing. Originally I was going to use the second() function, but Luis told me that the second() function would not work, as when the second() function reaches 59, it resets back to 0, whereas the millis() function keeps counting forwards without stopping. Below is the code for the timer.

Timer code

Screen Shot 2017-05-18 at 3.25.43 AM

The variable “time” is set to millis(), the variable “timee” is timestamped at the beginning of the function within a boolean if statement so it only timestamps once. The timestamp is then compared to the current time and the amount of time the user has (variable “i”).

After creating the timer, the rest of the code was mostly duplicating the same code for all of the sensors. I had to tweak around some of the sensor values as some of them were set too high and some were set too low. As in the sensors that were not binary like the button and the touch sensor, some were too sensitive and some were not sensitive enough.

Below is a video of the product that I presented in class:

 

Final Thoughts

There is a lot about this project that I would like to improve. I mentioned a few of them in my presentation. I would improve the user experience, I would add a timer that would get shortened every time the user successfully completed a task. Luis suggested something interesting, maybe two Boxy’s, so two users could compete against each other. Rudy also suggested something interesting, if the colours of the screen corresponded to the action the user had to perform. All of these suggestions are great and I am sure would have made my project much more interesting and interactive.

In the end, although there is a lot about my project that could be improved on. I am still happy that I got this far with it. I learned a lot building this project. I learned how to create a design for laser-cutting. I improved my soldering skills. I learned how to use many different sensors, and how to communicate them to Processing simultaneously. And finally I feel like I really improved my coding ability. Many of the other projects presented in class and in the show were really, really amazing, but I am still happy at the progress I made, and the amount I learned creating my project.

import processing.serial.*; 
import processing.sound.*;
SoundFile music;

int sensor0 = 0;
int sensor1 = 0;
int sensor2 = 0;
int sensor3 = 0;
int sensor4 = 0;

int r;
int score = 0;
int time;
int showTime = 2000;
int i = 5000;
boolean setTime = false;
int timee = 0;
boolean potInit = false;
boolean potState = true;
boolean choice = false;
int counter = 201;
Serial myPort;

void setup() {
  size(600, 600);
  background(51);

  myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[3], 9600);
  myPort.bufferUntil('n');

  music = new SoundFile(this, "music.mp3");
  music.play();
}

void draw() {
 
  textSize(32);
  time = millis();
  
  if (counter >200)  {
    counter = 0;
  }

  if (choice == false ) {
   
    r = int(random(0, 4));
    choice = true;
    println("choice: "+round(r));
  }


  check();
}


void check() {
  if (r == 0) {
    if (setTime == false) {
      timee = time;
      setTime = true;
    } 


    //println("PRESS IT!");
    background(255, 255, 0);
    fill(75, 0, 130);
    text("PRESS IT!", 160, 300);
     text(score, 160, 400);
  
    if ( (time-timee)<=i) {
      println(time);


      if (sensor0 == 0) {
        println("BUTTON SUCCESS");
        background(124, 252, 0); //set background to green
        text("NICE BUTTON PRESS!", 160, 300);

        setTime = false;
        choice = false;
        score++;
        counter++;
      } else if ((sensor1 ==0 ) || (sensor2 == 1)||(sensor4 <= 5)) {
        background(255, 0, 0);
        text("DON'T TOUCH THAT!", 160, 300);
        delay(2000);
        
      }
    } else {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("NOT ON TIME!", 160, 300);

      println("BUTTON FAILURE");
      println(time);
      println("SCORE: "+score);
    }
  }


  if (r == 1) {
    if (setTime == false) {
      timee = time;
      setTime = true;
    }  
    background(255, 255, 0);
    println("COVER IT CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC");
    fill(75, 0, 130);
    text("COVER IT!", 160, 300);
     text(score, 160, 400);
  
    if ((time-timee)<=i) {
      println(time);

      if   (sensor1 <= 1) {
        background(124, 252, 0); //set background to green
        text("NICE COVER!", 160, 300);

        setTime = false;
        choice = false;
        score++;
        counter++;
      } else if ((sensor0 == 0 ) || (sensor2 == 1)||(sensor4 <= 5)) {
        background(255, 0, 0);
        text("DON'T TOUCH THAT!", 160, 300);
      }
    } else {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("DIDN'TCOVER ON TIME", 160, 300);

      println("LIGHT FAILURE");
      println(time);

      println("SCORE: "+score);
    }
  }



  if (r == 2) {
    if (setTime == false) {
      timee = time;
      setTime = true;
    }  
    background(255, 255, 0);
    fill(75, 0, 130);
    text("TOUCH IT", 160, 300);
     text(score, 160, 400);
  
    int passTime = time - timee;

    if (passTime < i) {
      println("pass time +      "+ passTime);

      if (sensor2 == 1) {
        background(124, 252, 0); //set background to green
        text("NICE TOUCH!", 160, 300);

        setTime = false;
        choice = false;
        score++;
        counter++;
      } else if ((sensor1 == 0 ) || (sensor2 == 1)||(sensor4 <= 5)) {
        background(255, 0, 0);
        text("DON'T TOUCH THAT!", 160, 300);
      }
    } else {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("DIDN'T TOUCH ON TIME", 160, 300);

      println("TOUCH FAILURE");
      println(time);
      println("SCORE: "+score);
    }
  }
  if (r == 3) {
    if (setTime == false) {
      timee = time;
      setTime = true;
    }  
    background(255, 255, 0);
    fill(75, 0, 130);
    text("TWIST IT!", 160, 300);
     text(score, 160, 400);
  
    if (potInit == false) {  //is this the first time we start the potentiometer game?
      potInit = true;
      if (sensor3 <= 200) {
        potState = false;
      } else if (sensor3 >= 700) {
        potState = true;
      }
    }
    //otherwise we check if the pot got twisted in time
    if (time-timee<=i) {
      println(time);


      if (((potState == false) && (sensor3 >= 700)) || ((potState == true) && (sensor3 <=200))) {
        background(124, 252, 0); //set background to green
        text("NICE TWIST!", 160, 300);

        setTime = false;
        choice = false;
        score++;
        potInit = false;
        counter++;
      }
    } else if ((sensor0 == 0)||(sensor1 ==0 ) || (sensor2 == 1)||(sensor4 <= 5)) {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("DON'T TOUCH THAT!", 160, 300);

      potInit = false;
    } else {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("YA DIDN'T TWIST ON TIME", 160, 300);

      println("POT FAIL");
      println(time);

      println("SCORE: "+score);
      potInit = false;
    }
  }

  if (r == 4) {
    if (setTime == false) {
      timee = time;
      setTime = true;
    }  
    background(255, 255, 0);
    fill(75, 0, 130);
    text("GROUND IT!", 160, 300);
     text(score, 160, 400);
  
    if  (time-timee<=i) {
      println(time);


      if (sensor4 <= 5) {
        background(124, 252, 0); //set background to green
        text("NICE GROUNDING!", 160, 300);

        setTime = false;
        choice = false;
        score++;
        counter++;
      }
    } else if ((sensor1 == 0 ) || (sensor2 == 1)||(sensor0 == 0)) {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("DON'T TOUCH THAT!", 160, 300);
    } else {
      background(255, 0, 0);
      text("YA DIDN'T GROUND ON TIME", 160, 300);

      println("GROUND IT FAIL");
      println(time);

      println("SCORE: "+score);
    }
  }
}






void serialEvent(Serial myPort) {
  // get the ASCII string:
  String inString = myPort.readStringUntil('n');


  if (inString != null) {
    // trim off any whitespace:
    inString = trim(inString);
    // split the string on the commas and convert the
    // resulting substrings into an integer array:
    int[] sensors = int(split(inString, ","));
    // if the array has at least two elements, you know
    // you got the whole thing.  Put the numbers in the
    // sensor variables:
    if (sensors.length >=4) {

      sensor0 = sensors[0]; //button
      sensor1 = sensors[1];  //light sensor
      sensor2 = sensors[2];  //touch sensor
      sensor3 = sensors[3];  //potetiometer
      sensor4 = sensors[4];  //ranger
    }
    //printArray(sensors);
    //println("-");
  }
}

Soil Test #2 – Digital Farm Documentation

Date: May 4th, 2017

Instructor: Dan

We were assigned with taking a soil sample from somewhere reasonably away from campus and also the dorms, test the soil, and then post the results to fulcrum. After having sushi in Lujiazui, I decided to take a soil sample from outside the restaurant. There were a couple flower pots outside shown below.

IMG_20170224_144128IMG_20170224_144133

The pots were in front of the Hang Seng Bank Tower. The address was: 1000 Lujiazui Ring Road. I put the soil in a cleaned out Sprite bottle, and let it sit until the dirt rested on the bottom. After the soiled rested, I used the test kit to test for Phosphorus, Nitrogen, Potash, and pH.

 Soil Test Kits

IMG_20170505_102809

I used the respective pills for each of the tests, shook, and let it sit for 10 minutes before comparing the colours. The results were:

pH: 6.5

Phosphorus: P4 – Surplus

Nitrogen: No Depleted

Potash: K3 – Sufficient

After taking the results, I posted them to Fulcrum.

Test Results on Fulcrum

Screen Shot 2017-05-08 at 12.47.27 PM

Motor Drawing – Interaction Lab 11 Documentation

Date: April 28th, 2017

Instructor: Marcela

Partner: Sjur

Materials Used:

  • Arduino
  • Breadboard
  • Wires
  • Potentiometer
  • Stepper Motor
  • Power Supply
  • USB Cable

For this lab we were assigned with creating a drawing machine. The machine would use two stepper motors attached to a kind of lever, and finally attached to a marker in order to draw random sketches or artful masterpieces. We would work in groups of two to create one of the drawing arms, and then team up with another group in order to complete the two drawing arms.

To start, we followed the circuit diagram to wire up the breadboard. It was a little complicated to find the correct wiring, but in the end we completed it. The board looked very busy with cables after completion.

Circuit Diagram

   IMG_20170428_113257

Completed Circuit 

IMG_20170428_113240

Wires to the Stepper Motor

IMG_20170428_113231

After we completed the circuit, we created the drawing arm. This was very simple as all we had to do was use pins to connect two parts together. The pen would rest in the hole at the end.

Drawing Arm

IMG_20170428_113216

Drawing Arm in Action

After we completed both the arm and the circuitry, it was time to team up with another team in order to join the two arms together to create the final drawing machine. The machine ended up drawing random patterns but mostly in the form of circles. We also had the adjust the height of the drawing board and also the height of the drawing machine as they were uneven.

We also added a potentiometer to the breadboard in order to control the speed of the motor. This way we could get different shapes and sketches based on the speed of the two stepper motors. Setting the two stepper motors to different speeds would make the sketches more interesting.

Drawing Machine Final Product

On Display at the Louvre

IMG_20170428_120057

 

Final Project Proposal – Interaction Lab Documentation

Date: April 27th, 2017

Instructor: Marcela

Define Interaction.

Interaction is a two way street. When there reciprocal action and influence. When there is a response to an action. Interaction can come in all different forms. It can be from human to human, human to machine, machine to machine. From our day to day conversations, to the traffic light that operates on the streets. Interaction can be found everywhere.

Final Project Proposal.

For my final project, I want to create a game that involves reflexes. It will not simply be a reflex game with one aspect or input. It will have multiple inputs using various different sensors. The different inputs/sensors can include: buttons, light sensors, vibration sensors, proximity sensors, and more. I plan on using the 3D printer to create a polished looking, and easy to hold device. The device will house the electronics, and sensors. Through processing, the user will be prompted to perform a certain action, such as press a button, or cover the lighting sensor. If the user completes the action successfully, the user will be prompted to perform another action. The process will continue on, with each successful level the user passes, the time that is allowed for each action to be completed gets shorter. If the user fails to complete the action in the given time, then it will show that he/she has lost. A nice accompaniment to this interface would be music that plays, and gets faster and faster as the user progresses. I feel like this would add a layer of excitement and pressure on the user.

I got the inspiration for the project through a game that I used to play when I was younger called Bop It. Bop it’s inputs are a pulling button, button, microphone, and twisting button. The speaker in the Bop It will call out an action and the user has less and less time to complete that action as he progresses further. I feel like this would be a fun game to create, and also a fun game to play. I feel like a game like this would really encapsulate the definition of interaction. There is constant communication and interaction between the user, the Arduino, and Processing.

“Grass Beard” Update #1 – Digital Farm

Date: April 21, 2017

Instructor: Dan

This is the first of two updates for our experimentation with grass. To my surprise, when checking on my grass after not watering it for some time, the seeds had sprouted and some grass had grown. The grass had grown about 2-3 inches. I attribute my project no drying out to either other people watering it for me, or the fact that I had placed my “grass beard” in an Arduino case, and had it filled to the top. When I checked, there was still a lot of water sitting in the bottom. Some, but not all the seeds had sprouted. I believe this is the case because when wet, the foam that the seeds rest in floats to the top. Which means some of the seeds are not exposed to the water, even if the case is full.

Progress

IMG_20170426_143331

Upclose

IMG_20170426_143336

 

Ecovative and Mushroom Bricks Reading Response

I really like the idea of using mushrooms as packing material. But what I wonder is, is this project viable on a large scale? Would it be cost-effective and incentivize larger corporations to adopt this as their packing material? Or would this product just stay in a niche market. Looking at the shop of the store, it says that a packing box for three bottles of wine would cost $15. I am sure that conventional cardboard packaging is much less than that. $15 is a huge sum of money to pay for packaging. Other than the business aspect of the product I believe it a very innovative and creative idea. Of course it would be ideal if it were most cost-effective.

I really think that Phillip Ross using mushrooms as building material is a very cool idea. But again I question whether it would ever become more than just art. Could it become an actual structurally stable building material for buildings? Perhaps in less developed countries, this idea has more traction. As an art though I believe it is a very cool material. To me, it is not aesthetically pleasing, and I’m not sure how it would smell in the gallery. But it is just the idea of combining biology and art that makes it interesting to me.

The obvious potential benefits of both the projects are that they are environmentally friendly, and find an alternative use for mushrooms other than just consuming.

Creating A Stamp With Illustrator – Interaction Lab 9 Documentation

Date: April 14th, 2017

Instructor: Marcela

For this lab we were assigned with creating a stamp that would later be 3D printed. The stamp would have a NYUSH IMA logo on it. We followed a tutorial and used Adobe illustrator to create the stamp.

We first put the layer of the stamp we wanted to create as a reference. We then used the ellipse tool to create three ellipses for the stamp.

Ellipse Tool in Illustrator

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 4.27.14 PM

After creating our ellipses and making them red. We had to type the words for our stamp. For this, we needed to type along the circle. So we used the “Type on Path” tool.

Type on Path Tool

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 4.27.07 PM

I didn’t figure out how to reverse the type, so the bottom text would be on its own. I tried to create a second identical ellipse over the first to see if I could create a separate line of text but it did not work. I ended up having to settle for a little wonky looking text.

Unfinished Final Product

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 4.26.58 PM