Week 6, Visual Communication – Alice Kwok (Leon)

Documentation:

My research project is the iCloud. An interactive umbrella shaped like a cloud.

Step 1:

This is the 3D model that I made in Tinkercad. I first used the scribble tool to draw a cloud and fill inside the cloud so that it is solid. Then later I added spheres onto the cloud-solid to make it a more 3-dimensional figure.

The view from the top:

The view from the side:

Step 2:

I used the screenshot with the view from the top and use the trace function on it.

I then added many white circles on top of this traced cloud in order to make it appear more full. I also add some white shadow behind the cloud to make it look more 3 dimensional.

Step 3:

I decide to do a dark raining theme for the poster. So I made the background black and leave the bottom area empty to put the product name, slogan and team’s name. I try to differentiate the clouds that I put on the sky with the iCloud by making the natural clouds darker with a grey colour, and give the iCloud a white colour. I used a few free vectors from freepik such as the dog and the family. I used the trace function and clipping mask functions on the free vector to incorporate it into the poster. I think a small issue with my poster is the proportion of the dog and the humans, as they are not in the right proportion.

Below is my poster:

Credits:

<a href=”https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/background”>Background vector created by Freepik</a>

<a href=’https://www.freepik.com/free-vector/silhouettes-of-a-dog_1028058.htm’>Designed by Kjpargeter</a>

<a href=’https://www.freepik.com/free-vector/family-silhouettes_725263.htm’>Designed by Freepik</a>

<a href=’https://www.freepik.com/free-vector/city-map-background-with-pointers_1106828.htm’>Designed by Freepik</a>

 

Week 5, Drawing Machine – Alice Kwok (Leon)

Documentation:

During step 1, I was trying to be really careful when I’m plugging in the wires on the breadboard. A thing that I noticed is that there are not enough coloured wires such as red and black, so I have to substitute white wires in the end when I’m trying to finish building the circuit. This makes identifying the wires a bit harder because I’m used to the notion that red wire means power and black wire means ground.

Step 2 is harder and trickier than step 1. The first small issue I ran into is inserting the potentiometer into the circuit to allow analog input because I’m confused which pins go with which wires. The second issue I ran into is using the function “map()” after asking for help, I finally understand how to use the map function.

Step 3 is pretty easy in terms of assembling all the parts to create a drawing machine. However, it is a bit hard to control the drawing machine, especially the direction it is going. A small thing that my partner and I run into is that the pen could not touch the paper. So, we end up putting something underneath the paper to elevate it.

Question 1

I would be interested to build a small machine with different sensors to help the user locate objects. This will be extremely useful for people who often lose their belongings. A problem I think I will run into is the size since it should be a smaller machine so that it will be easy for people to put it in the pocket to carry around. However, this means that all the different sensors will have to fit inside. I think this machine will not use much digital manipulation of art since it’s a machine that helps locate items, I think a simple change in colour (for example from red to green when the object is found) will be sufficient or a buzzer that will ‘beep’ when the object is found.

Question 2

I think the Fish, Plant, Rack project by Andy Gracie is very interesting, I think it’s fascinating how a robot can readjust the environment the fish is in. Future explored, there could be some machines or robots that can help talk care of fishes without needing any human’s help. However, in some ways, this could be a bit scary as it shows how easily a robot can control a creature’s whole surrounding. I think this project is pretty different from the drawing machine since the drawing machine still needs human help to control the motor in order to change the direction of where the pen is going, while in Fish, Plant, Rack project the robot is self-sufficient on its own without any external help.

 

/*
 * MotorKnob
 *
 * A stepper motor follows the turns of a potentiometer
 * (or other sensor) on analog input 0.
 *
 * http://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/Stepper
 * This example code is in the public domain.
 */

#include <Stepper.h>

// change this to the number of steps on your motor
#define STEPS 200

// create an instance of the stepper class, specifying
// the number of steps of the motor and the pins it's
// attached to
Stepper stepper(STEPS, 8, 9, 10, 11);

// the previous reading from the analog input
int previous = 0;

void setup() {
  // set the speed of the motor to 30 RPMs
  stepper.setSpeed(30);
}

void loop() {
  // get the sensor value
  int val = analogRead(0);
  val = map(val,0,1023,0,200);

  // move a number of steps equal to the change in the
  // sensor reading
  stepper.step(val - previous);

  // remember the previous value of the sensor
  previous = val;
}

Prototype – Alice Kwok (Leon)

The name of my product is called a GPS Drive. It is essentially a thumb drive that runs a program to helps students who are struggling with the GPS course. I made this product because my partner said that he is very stressed with writing the GPS essay that is due very soon.

So this program has many different parts. There’s a timer section at the top left corner of the screen that helps countdown how much time the students have before they have to submit the essay. The bar on the left side consists of an auto-citation function and quote searcher that helps search quotes in the particular texts you are focused on which is relevant to your essay. It also helps you point out and correct the grammar, spelling and sentence structure mistake in your essay.

Week 4, Group Project – Alice Kwok (Leon)

I believe interaction is the action of transmitting (input) and receiving (output) information between more than one party.

I really like this “Voice-Controlled Interactive Projection Mapping” project. It allows voice to shape the visuals being projected on an object. I think this project can be easily implemented in other buildings and/or items making ‘ordinary’ objects more creative and interesting to use, allowing the public to interact with objects that they would normally not or want to interact with. I think the visuals projected could have more varieties or changes, this could maybe allow the project to become more than just an interactive voice-visual project but as a tool maybe use in academics to teach young children.

I don’t really like “Parangonets: Interactive Wearable Sculptures” project. Although I think this project can be expanded to many possibilities, as of the project itself I think it is quite limited in the interaction with the surrounding. Wearing the outfits only allow users to make sounds based on the movement of the clothing, I think in this project the interaction is merely between the user swinging the outfits (input) and the sound (output).

Project:

Our interactive project is called iCloud, also stands for interactive Creative Lifestyle . Umbrella Design.

We came up with the idea of iCloud since a lot of times when we are using the umbrella, the umbrella might be too small or heavy for some people. Also often times, you often get stabbed by other people’s umbrella while walking down the street especially in a crowded area. Sometimes the wind or rain could also be too big, making people unable to have a firm grip on the umbrella.

iCloud is an interactive self-adjustable umbrella that is shaped like a cloud floating/hovering above the head of the user. There’s many functions such as an emoji function that allows the people around you to see the mood you currently have on the iCloud. There’s also an air quality index and GPS system in the iCloud that acts as an interactive screen in front of the user’s face which can also be collected into the iCloud. Users are also able to communicate with each other through iCloud (with the interactive screen). They are able to interact with other users of iCloud by combining iCloud together after permission from the users into a bigger iCloud base on the area the people under the iCloud take. iCloud also comes in many different modes such as sunny, windy, rainy, snowy mode depending on which weather the user is using the iCloud.

I think this proposal in some way is a response to the critique to “Parangonets: Interactive Wearable Sculptures” project. As I said a reason I do not like the particular project because it seems to be pretty limited in the ways of interaction between the user and the environment. I think the iCloud really try to incorporate as much interaction between the user with the product itself (such as emoji function, size change according to the area the user takes), the user and the environment (GPS system, AQI, different modes of iCloud) and between users and other users (such as communication or sharing an iCloud). We hope to make iCloud an interactive project that is able to really interact with all sorts of people and the environment.

Week 3, Sensors – Alice Kwok (Leon)

Documentation:

My partner and I decided to use the moisture sensor.

Materials:

  • Arduino
  • 2 220 Ohm Resistor
  • Moisture Sensor
  • 9 Jumper Cables
  • 2 LED

First, the circuit went really well when we try to connect the moisture sensor into the circuit.

We later tried to build the circuit with two LEDs, we sample the Arduino code from Fade in the Examples area and modify it so that both LEDs will light up when the moisture level is above 100 and both LEDs dimming when it is below 100. A little error we run to is the Arduino code to make both LEDs dimed when below 100. We were a bit confused if we should use ‘if’ or ‘else’ in the code, but in the end after using ‘if’ in the code, the circuit work as planned.

With some time left in the end, we end up modifying the circuit so that one LED will light up if the moisture level is above 100 and dimmed when below 100, and the other LED light up if the moisture level is above 50 and dimmed when below 50 by connecting the LEDs with two different pins instead of one pin like in the first circuit. (The Arduino code below is for the second circuit)

Question 1:

We intend to assemble a sensor that allows people to know the moisture level through the LEDs. It can be used in a bakery or a restaurant to check the moisture level in the storage if it is up to the standard.

Question 2:

I can identify this circuit in a machine that shows the moisture level in a sauna or outdoor. It can show when the moisture level is in the standard range or outside the standard rate. Allowing people to take appropriate actions.

Question 3:

It is similar because in a recipe and tutorial following the instruction in the particular sequence is really crucial. Similarly, the sequence of the Arduino code is extremely important. It will affect how the Arduino sequence out the actions thus affecting the whole circuit.

Question 4:

I think computers have made an immense impact on human behaviours, humans incorporate computers in almost every single part of our daily life. An example is using computers to help the people with disabilities so that they are able to adapt to the surrounding better. This will make their daily life easier to cope with.

 


int sensorPin = A0;
int sensorValue = 0;
int led = 9;           // the PWM pin the LED is attached to
int ledd = 10;
int brightness = 0;    // how bright the LED is
int fadeAmount = 5;    // how many points to fade the LED by

void setup() {
    Serial.begin(9600);
     pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
}
void loop() {
    // read the value from the sensor:
    sensorValue = analogRead(sensorPin);
    Serial.print("Moisture = " );
    Serial.println(sensorValue);
    delay(1000);
    
    
    if ( sensorValue > 50) {
    analogWrite(led, brightness);
    
 

  // change the brightness for next time through the loop:
  brightness = brightness + fadeAmount;

  // reverse the direction of the fading at the ends of the fade:
  if (brightness <= 0 || brightness >= 255) {
    fadeAmount = -fadeAmount;
  }
  // wait for 100 milliseconds to see the dimming effect
  delay(10);
} 
  

if (sensorValue < 50) {
  digitalWrite (led, LOW);
  digitalWrite (ledd, LOW);
}

if (sensorValue > 100) {
    analogWrite(ledd, brightness);
    digitalWrite (led, LOW);   
    
 

  // change the brightness for next time through the loop:
  brightness = brightness + fadeAmount;

  // reverse the direction of the fading at the ends of the fade:
  if (brightness <= 0 || brightness >= 255) {
    fadeAmount = -fadeAmount;
  }
  // wait for 100 milliseconds to see the dimming effect
  delay(10);
} 
  



}

Week 2, Arduino Basics – Alice Kwok (Leon)

Documentation:

Circuit 1: Fade

Materials:

  • Arduino
  • LED
  • 220 ohm Resistor
  • 4 Jumper Cables
  • USB Connector

Working on this circuit is pretty easy as we have already work on this circuit during the lecture.

Circuit 2: Tone Melody

Materials:

  • Arduino
  • Buzzer
  • 2 Hook-Up Wires
  • USB Connector

This circuit is also pretty easy to work with. The only small issue we ran into is finding the right type of wires for the buzzer as we realised that the original wires that we use does not work with the buzzer.

Circuit 3: Zelda Simon Says

Materials:

  • Arduino
  • 4 LED (different colour)
  • 5 Push-Button Switch
  • USB Connector
  • Buzzer
  • 2 Hook-Up Wires
  • 4 220 Ohm Resistor
  • 5 10 Ohm Resistor
  • 18 Jumper Cables

 

My partner and I choose Zelda Simon Says as the third circuit. Due to the amount of wires there are in the circuit, it is very easy to get confuse which wire have to plug in to which pins in the Arduino. This is a problem that we ran into (which I will talk about a bit later). From first glance, this particular circuit needs 4 different colours of LED, a staff borrow us a white colour LED so we have 4 different colours of LED.

The first small confusion that we had is the different ohm of resistor in the circuit (there’s one with 220 ohm and 10 ohm), so we are really careful about which types of resistor goes with which part of the circuit). Additionally, since we are unable to plug in the buzzer into the breadboard directly, we used the hook-up wires from circuit 2 to connect the buzzer to the breadboard.

The first issue we ran into after we plug in all the wires is that the wires block the buttons so that people are unable to click the push-button switch easily. We decided to reorder the wires by plugging out wires that are in the way. During this process, we did not realised that we have plug in incorrectly 4 wires (we put it into a different pins). Thus, after that copying the Arduino code and transferring the code into the Arduino, the LED in the circuit does not automatically shows the sequence of light after the start button had been pushed. After asking for help, we then realised that 4 of the wires are plug consecutively in the wrong pins.  After recorrecting the wires, the game works perfectly.

Question 1:

  • Automatic doors: When you walk through the library door in NYU Shanghai, the door automatically opens. This could be an interaction, your person is the input and the door opens is the output.
  • Automatic Faucet: When you put your hand near the sensor (the sensor detect your motion), the water will gushed out of the faucet. In this interaction, your hand is the input and the water from the faucet is the output.
  • Card Reader (ie. how you pay in the cafeteria): When you placed your NYU Student card on the reader, the reader will automatically deduct the amount of money you have to pay from your card. The card being placed on the reader is the input in this interaction and the reader deduce the amount of money from the card is the output.

Question 2:

In the circuit, there are inputs such as USB cable and push-button switch and outputs such as LEDs and buzzer.

Question 3:

I’ll make a small string of lights that can be hung on the wall from the bedroom to the bathroom. Whenever I walk past the string, the particular section of the string of light that I’m next to will light up automatically. This way I’ll not trip or slam into any walls or furniture, and the string of light will be warmer and less shocking to the eye than an actual lamp or light source.

Question 4:

The nature of interaction allows us to interact in more different ways like sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell (the five senses). However, often we are limit to the interaction of sight, touch and audio when we use our computers and electronics.

/*This sketch is a simple version of the famous Simon Says game. You can use it and improved it adding
  levels and everything you want to increase the diffuculty!

  There are five buttons connected to A0, A1, A2, A3 and A4.
  The buttons from A0 to A3 are used to insert the right sequence while A4 to start the game.

  When a wrong sequence is inserted all the leds will blink for three time very fast otherwhise the
  inserted sequence is correct.


  Hardware needed:
  5x pushbuttons
  1x Blue led
  1x Yellow led
  1x Red led
  1x Green Led
  4x 1k resistors
  4x 10k resisors
  10x jumpers
  
  Source: https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/Arduino_Scuola/a-simple-simon-says-game-25ba99
https://www.hackster.io/Arduino_Scuola/a-simple-simon-says-game-25ba99

*/
#define NOTE_A4  440
#define NOTE_AS4 466
#define NOTE_B4  494
#define NOTE_C5  523
#define NOTE_CS5 523

#define startButton 2
#define button1  3
#define button2  4
#define button3  5
#define button4  6
#define LED1 7
#define LED2  8
#define LED3 9
#define LED4  10
#define buzzer  11

const int MAX_LEVEL = 100;
int sequence[MAX_LEVEL];
int your_sequence[MAX_LEVEL];
int level = 1;

int velocity = 1000;

void setup() {
  pinMode(startButton, INPUT);
  pinMode(button1, INPUT);
  pinMode(button2, INPUT);
  pinMode(button3, INPUT);
  pinMode(button4, INPUT);
  pinMode(LED1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(LED4, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(buzzer, OUTPUT);

  digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
}

void loop()
{
  if (level == 1)
    generate_sequence();//generate a sequence;

  if (digitalRead(startButton) == LOW || level != 1) //If start button is pressed or you're winning
  {
    show_sequence();    //show the sequence
    get_sequence();     //wait for your sequence
  }
  noTone(buzzer);

}

void show_sequence()
{
  digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);

  for (int i = 0; i < level; i++)
  {
    switch (sequence[i]) {
      case (2):
        digitalWrite(LED1, HIGH);
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_CS5, 100);
        delay(velocity);
        digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
        noTone(buzzer);
        delay(200);
        break;
      case (3):
        digitalWrite(LED2, HIGH);
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_B4, 100);
        delay(velocity);
        digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
        noTone(buzzer);
        delay(200);
        break;
      case (4):
        digitalWrite(LED3, HIGH);
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_AS4, 100);
        delay(velocity);
        digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
        noTone(buzzer);
        delay(200);
        break;
      case (5):
        digitalWrite(LED4, HIGH);
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_A4, 100);
        delay(velocity);
        digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
        noTone(buzzer);
        delay(200);
        break;

    }

  }
  noTone(buzzer);
}

void get_sequence()
{
  int flag = 0; //this flag indicates if the sequence is correct

  for (int i = 0; i < level; i++)
  {
    flag = 0;
    while (flag == 0)
    {
      if (digitalRead(button4) == LOW)
      {
        digitalWrite(LED4, HIGH);
        your_sequence[i] = 5;
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_A4, 100);
        flag = 1;
        delay(200);
        if (your_sequence[i] != sequence[i])
        {
          wrong_sequence();
          return;
        }
        digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
      }

      if (digitalRead(button3) == LOW)
      {
        digitalWrite(LED3, HIGH);
        your_sequence[i] = 4;
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_AS4, 100);
        flag = 1;
        delay(200);
        if (your_sequence[i] != sequence[i])
        {
          wrong_sequence();
          return;
        }
        digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
      }

      if (digitalRead(button2) == LOW)
      {
        digitalWrite(LED2, HIGH);
        your_sequence[i] = 3;
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_B4, 100);
        flag = 1;
        delay(200);
        if (your_sequence[i] != sequence[i])
        {
          wrong_sequence();
          return;
        }
        digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
      }

      if (digitalRead(button1) == LOW)
      {
        digitalWrite(LED1, HIGH);
        your_sequence[i] = 2;
        tone(buzzer, NOTE_CS5, 100);
        flag = 1;
        delay(200);
        if (your_sequence[i] != sequence[i])
        {
          wrong_sequence();
          return;
        }
        digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
      }

    }
  }
  noTone(buzzer);
  right_sequence();
}

void generate_sequence()
{
  randomSeed(millis()); //in this way is really random!!!

  for (int i = 0; i < MAX_LEVEL; i++)
  {
    sequence[i] = random(2, 6);
  }
}
void wrong_sequence()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
  {
    digitalWrite(LED1, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED2, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED3, HIGH);
    digitalWrite(LED4, HIGH);
    tone(buzzer, 30);
    delay(250);
    digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
    digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
    tone(buzzer, 10);
    delay(250);
  }
  noTone(buzzer);
  level = 1;
  velocity = 1000;
}

void right_sequence()
{
  delay(500);
  digitalWrite(LED1, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED2, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED3, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED4, HIGH);
  tone(buzzer, NOTE_A4);
  delay(250);
  digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
  tone(buzzer, NOTE_AS4);
  delay(250);
  digitalWrite(LED1, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED2, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED3, HIGH);
  digitalWrite(LED4, HIGH);
  tone(buzzer, NOTE_B4);
  delay(250);
  digitalWrite(LED1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(LED4, LOW);
  tone(buzzer, NOTE_CS5);
  delay(1200);
  noTone(buzzer);
  delay(500);
  if (level < MAX_LEVEL);
  level++;

  velocity -= 50; //increase difficulty
}

Week 1, Electronics & Soldering – Alice Kwok (Leon)

Documentation

Circuit 1: Door Bell

Components:

  • Breadboard: Used to prototype circuit
  • LM7805 Voltage Regulator: Used to regulate the voltage to a constant level
  • Buzzer: Used to emit sound
  • Push-Button Switch: Used to switch on or off the circuit
  • 100nF (0.1uF) Capacitor: Used to store electricity
  • 12-volt power supply: Used to provide electricity
  • Barrel Jack: Used to provide electricity
  • Jumper Cables: Used to carry electricity in the circuit

During the process of building the first circuit, we had some difficulty with placing the LM7805 Voltage Regulator in the breadboard, especially with the input, output and ground. In the end, after asking an instructor for help, we figure out how to put the Voltage Regulator in the proper location. Additionally, we couldn’t get the push-button switch to work. After asking for help, we realised that all four points of the push-button switch are connected since we are building the circuit on the breadboard (A and B, D and C are connected), thus the push-button doesn’t work. In the end, after we put the push-button switch between the gap in the middle of the breadboard which effectively cuts the connection between A and B, C and D, the switch works. But I’m still a bit confused in how to differentiate between A, B, C and D in the push button switch.

IMG_4366

Circuit 2: Lamp

Components:

  • Breadboard: Used to prototype circuit
  • LM7805 Voltage Regulator: Used to regulate the voltage to a constant level
  • LED: Used to emit light
  • Push-Button Switch: Used to switch on or off the circuit
  • Arcade Button: Used to switch on or off the circuit after being soldered with wires
  • 100nF (0.1uF) Capacitor: Used to store electricity
  • 220-ohm Resistor: Used to lower the flow of electricity in the circuit
  • 12-volt power supply: Used to provide electricity
  • Barrel Jack: Used to provide electricity
  • Jumper Cables: Used to carry electricity in the circuit
  • Multimeter: Used to test the connectivity of the soldered Arcade Button

The process of building the second circuit went pretty well. In the end, after we have soldered the new switch (Arcade Button), we use the multimeter to test the connectivity of the new switch. After ensuring that the new switch works, we switch it with the push-button switch. The new switch works well.

IMG_4369

Circuit 3: Dimmable Lamp

Components:

  • Breadboard: Used to prototype circuit
  • LM7805 Voltage Regulator: Used to regulate the voltage to a constant level
  • LED: Used to emit light
  • Push-Button Switch: Used to switch on or off the circuit
  • Arcade Button: Used to switch on or off the circuit after being soldered with wires
  • 100nF (0.1uF) Capacitor: Used to store electricity
  • 220-ohm Resistor: Used to lower the flow of electricity in the circuit
  • 10K ohm Variable Resistor (Potentiometer): Work as a resistor (used to lower the flow of electricity in the circuit), but adjustable
  • 12-volt power supply: Used to provide electricity
  • Barrel Jack: Used to provide electricity
  • Jumper Cables: Used to carry electricity in the circuit
  • Multimeter: Used to test the connectivity of the soldered Arcade Button

During the process of building of the third circuit, we decided to use the new switch instead of the push-button switch. We had a problem with inserting the potentiometer as we keep mixing up the direction of the potentiometer (which direction the knob is facing). But in the end, after we figure it out the direction, the circuit works finely.

IMG_4375

Question 1

From the reading “The Art of Interactive Design,” I believe that the circuits that we’ve build includes interactivity but to a lower degree. The author of the text presents interaction as a “cyclic process in which two actors alternately listen, think, and speak.” (5) This means that a person pressing the switch which causes the LED to light up or the buzzer to sound in the circuit could be counted as a “cyclic process.” (5) Here the person pressing the switch and the LED/buzzer act as the actors in the process. However, similarly, the author also states that “I’m concerned with interactivity that has some blood in its veins.” (6) This could otherwise mean that although circuits include interactivity, it has a lower degree of interactivity. I believe that since the circuits can only be the ‘receiving’ party of the interaction as it can never proactively ’cause’ an interaction it cannot be considered as an object/thing of high interactivity.

Works Cited

Crawford, Chris. “The Art of Interactive Design.” 2002.
Question 2

In the first project showcase in the Zack Lieberman’s video, the interactive art where people can use their fingers to control the movement of the drawing is a combination of physical computing and interactive design. Physical computing is the mechanics or the power (like the battery) behind interactive designs. The building of interactive systems allows humans and objects to interact with the digital world. Interactive design show more of the artistic and aesthetic side, it presents the way how human and objects interact with the digital world. I think interactive art is most often created by the combination of physical computing and interactive design.

Works Cited

“Zach Lieberman: Interactive Art.” Vimeo, 5 Mar. 2010, vimeo.com/9939042.