The Dark Room – Group Project

Final Design Doc:

Concept: The user is immersed in darkness and must use their hearing to traverse the darkscape. Our intention is to have the user feel creeped out and uncomfortable, as if they are unwelcome in a strange place that exists without them.

Rules: The user begins in the center of the room. The user must walk around the VR experience with the HTC Vive controllers, triggering instances as they move. They must rely most often on the audio, but also must approach objects and lights to progress forward.

Assets:

-Audio: voices, light switch, knife, ticking, breathing, train whistle and movement, Audio spatializer

-Visual: 3D models, modified lighting script, table texture

-Technical: computer capable of running VR, HTC Vive headset and controllers, bluetooth headphones, small room

The Process:

creepy mannequins!

creepy mannequins!

Our game basically started with the idea that the user would follow sounds around the stage and that sets of items would appear with a certain theme. We moved from the initial idea of a department store in the dark to a sort of nightmarish, voluminous room that could be both open and claustrophobic at the same time. Most of the work involved finding decent 3D models that worked together to convey the mood of a specific set, and then placing those models in specific areas that would have contained trigger zones. The trigger script used with each set, although it underwent a bit of a change into being array-based, was fairly simple. It basically just said, when the player collides with this trigger, remove the trigger and the current set and instantiate the next set of objects and triggers.

I really enjoyed doing a lot of the stage design and creating a sequence for the player. However, I think I would like to tighten up the mood and theme a little more as far as style of the 3D models go. Some are at odds with others and it seems fairly obvious that we just sourced what we could find. If I could actually get good at 3D modeling, it could enhance the unity of the project.

The audio, while I think could be improved in quality, is what makes the experience. It was great learning to work with Audacity and seeing how powerful a simple, free program can be. For instance, all the mannequin voices are my voice but sound radically different. The one issue we ran into during playtesting with the HTC Vive was that the audio sources conflicted with each other in such a small space. For those playtesters who didn’t have especially keen ears, it was hard to track sound locations. I think this is just something that requires a lot of testing and tweaking to get the audio source ranges to the proper distance.

Lastly, I have to comment on the VR experience in general. It was my first VR trial and I was amazed at the quality of the visuals and audio. You are sucked into the world and really do lose your sense of space. Now I know that the particle effects look absolutely stunning VR (the train smoke, just wow!), I hope to try out some more in the future. This project has shaped my interest in games and 3D worlds a lot. Now that I had a shot working with the Vive, I don’t want to move back to non-VR experiences and game worlds. Wearing the Vive v. watching a screen in a chair are two completely different things, and I already have a preference for the former and look forward to how people express its capabilities in the future.

Individual Game – Lake Mutanto

lakemutantosign

My game, Lake Mutanto, is about camping out near a lake and, quite unsurprisingly, the radioactive lake spawns weird mutant traits in rowdy teens that were hanging out by it getting high and drinking beer. For my game, I designed three mutant teens in Fuse, which was super fun and easy to use. However, Fuse will not open any longer and won’t re-download on NYUSH wi-fi, so I have only two of them in-game because I can’t access the third Fuse file to export an FBX. Here are my mutants:

mutantteens This project went pretty smoothly until around the gameState bit. At some point, my mutants’ animations went haywire. They look very wacky and also slide towards the player when they are supposed to be standing still. This issue is the most irritating, because I’m not sure where it went wrong, and I tried changing the acceleration like in the guides and then also researching other methods, and nothing has worked. It was definitely cool when the mutants would stop at the perimeter of the glow from the player’s light.

I think that, at this stage, the game needs to be debugged and polished, with perhaps another mechanic to add to the fun of it. Currently, the player can easily outmaneuver the very basic AI of the mutants, even if the player is not faster than them. Also, I wish I had more time to add audio at the beginning of the player noticing how strange everything looks and calling their mom to come pick them up. That way, there’s a reason for the big black van to come barreling towards the fence at the end.

vanGoals for Future Changes:

-very smooth transitions between mutant animations

-a better animation with sound for the van coming to save the player (might knock down the fence instead of moving through it like a ghost)

-an intro of some sort, either text that indicates the player character’s thoughts about Lake Mutanto or audio indicating they want to get the hell out

-an improved health system; currently, just touching the mutants lowers health; I would rather the player lost health when the mutant did its kicking or swiping animation

-some sparse objects/sights of interest in the dense forest area; I want to naturally guide the player to the fence, but at this point it’s easy to get turned around and a little lost

-a more natural reason for the handlight to flicker on and off; I also tried lerping the light on and off but it wouldn’t work with the time restrictions; I would like to tweak that too and get it to a little flicker then it turns off—I was thinking of using a battery system where you can only keep it on for so long before it goes out forever

-a menu and proper start and win screens

Final Assignment: Ruined Temple Level of Group Project

At the beginning of the class, my role in the project had much to do with creating the thematic aspects of the game. We had plenty of ideas that we wanted to implement, but it was equally important for us to select and choose what was feasible within our skill levels and time-limit.

From then on, all of our team member’s roles simply diverged to working on our own individual environments. I got to work designing the interior and exterior of my temple, Kadallah went to work creating his awesome dystopian waste-land city, Mate began sculpting his desert, and Jeffrey as well.

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The one aspect of our project’s creation that I enjoyed the most was designing the architecture of the temple building. In my first Creating Immersive Worlds assignment, I mentioned how much I loved looking at the concept art work of the environments. Implementing all of the small details into the temple’s exterior and interior (For example, the broken floor tiles that jut out from the rest of the floor), made me feel like I was designing with the same mindsets as my favorite creators.

The most challenging aspect for me was the technical implementation of the game features into my environment. I had a blast designing and modeling my building, but giving the player free movement within-it proved to be much more challenging than I thought! The ruined floor tiles of the temples were made to give off a rustic aesthetic, but they actually began impeding the user’s movement if I put down to many! Figuring out the scripts for more customized torches was also quite difficult for me.

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Creating Immersive Worlds HW#4

Project name: Zombies around the Temple

Project Response Feeling: A feeling of cautious curiosity. There is much to explore in this world… but you’re not alone out there.

For my play testing sessions, I selected two of my friends: one an avid video game player and one who wasn’t. I felt that by choosing people with varying experiences with video games, they could reveal more to me in what my game experience was doing correctly and what it was lacking. In the end, I think it was a good choice. The person experienced with video games was able to note some very technical aspects that brought him out of immersion, and the person who was not experienced with video games was able to speak more to the vibes of the experience rather than the technical issues.

Subject 1:
Creativity Score:10
Emotional Response:The designs of the sculptures were certainly eye-catching. However, the way they were placed didn’t seem like it had any rhyme or reason to it. It just seemed like they were strewn about the area. I was trying to find some meaning in their placement (like a map of sorts), but I don’t think there was any to begin with.
Engagement Score: 27 seconds

Subject 2:
Creativity Score: 7
Emotional Response: The design of the zombie is a little too cute for how the environment looks! Maybe you should add a spookier one because, well, if your aim was to make me feel anxious you weren’t doing that good of a job.
Engagement Score: 5 seconds

Playtest Notes:
Thomas Wong: The speed is a little too slow my taste right now. You should up it a bit, or give the option to run in the game. There’s simply too much space to cover with the speed that I’m walking at.

Anthony Ho: The trees are blocking me from having any good view at the entirety of the area. Maybe try clearing out a patch of trees so players can effectively find where they’re supposed to find the escape car?

“Creating Immersive World Final Group Project: Escape the School” by Mercy Angela K Nantongo, Kalkidan Fekadu Eteffa, Katherine Thoma-Hilliard and Zhuoling Shi

Here is our final design document:

https://docs.google.com/a/nyu.edu/document/d/1bClSctLqMEVU5oqHCX1uYg1dN0IJR7MptdcsPuHk1XY/edit?usp=sharing

I was the game designer of the group project, which means I’m in charge of designing set ups and rules. I composed design documents, designed the set up of the building, took plenty of skybox pictures, searched for all kinds of assets in asset store or online, and creating original textures and materials which I did not do in my individual project. I also made some 3D models to serve as assets in the game view. I liked the job of designing the roles because I have the passion of making fun or funny games and I would think what I would like to have in a certain game. Making the arrangement of rooms and combining multiple rooms with multiple functions in one areas is what I am good at. I guess because of my imagination, I can put things together in a creative way. These creative arrangements could also make people feel real instead of non-realistic. I think this is very important for creating immersive experience that the design should not be predictable, but it has to be realistic.

I did not really do a good job on making 3D models. Though I enjoy the process of making them and I love spending time to make the objects look more real. However, I was not a person who is good at using softwares. After I made those models, they could not be imported into unity. I tried to use blender to change the format, but I really had no idea on how to use blender. Which was really frustrating. Searching for assets and beautifying materials was pretty fun and I loved spending time on making my own materials.

“Final Individual Project: Zombie Game” by Zhuoling Shi (Susan)

My unity refused to build either .exe file or .app file, so I cannot upload the game here.

When making this game, I really enjoyed the process of beautifying the environment. In order to make an immersive experience, much effort should be put into the artistic part. I created some texture and also selected the best assets that I want in the asset store. I wanted to have the geography more natural, but I am not satisfied with my result. I should have used photoshop to edit more and make the scene look better. I loved the sun in my previous project, but I somehow missed it by accident and I could not make a same one anymore.

The most challenging part was to code with C# language. This is a language that I have never encountered before. Since I did not know the basic knowledge of it, what I have done is to modify other codes for my own usage. Besides, there are many problems that are not obvious enough to be noticed easily, I made a lot of spelling errors and higher/lowercase errors. When these kinds of things happen, It is really hard to get anything to work. When the scripts have any error, the whole program will not run and I could not test anything in my game until I found the bug.

For the last part of the game, it was funny. The bus fall from above the player and sometimes may fall onto the playing. Because I did not make the settings properly, the bus may sometimes turnover after hitting the player. When the player is running, he can even push the bus along with him, which is ridiculous.

IMG_2582 IMG_2583

Another problems was than when I adjust the font size of “You Win”, it would just disappear. Only font size of 14 could work in that.

IMG_2584

“Creating Immersive Worlds HW4: Playtesting” by Zhuoling Shi (Susan)

Here are the results of THE CREATIVE EXPERIENCE QUESTIONNAIRE:

PLAYTESTER # _____1____
# QUESTION YES NO
1 As a child, I thought that the dolls, teddy bears and stuffed animals that I played with were living creatures. 1
2 As a child, I strongly believed in the existence of dwarfs, elves, and other fairy tale figures. 1
3 As a child, I had my own make believe friend or animal. 1
4 As a child, I could very easily identify with the main character of a story and/or movie. 1
5 As a child, I sometimes had the feeling that I was someone else (e.g.,a princess, an orphan, etc.). 1
6 As a child, I was encouraged by adults (parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters) to fully indulge myself in my fantasies and daydreams. 1
7 As a child, I devoted my time to playing a musical instrument, dancing, acting, and/or drawing. 1
8 I spend more than half the day (daytime) fantasizing or daydreaming. 1
9 Many of my friends and/or relatives do not know that I have such detailed fantasies. 1
10 Many of my fantasies are often just as lively as a good movie. 1
11 I am never bored because I start fantasizing when things get boring. 1
12 Sometimes I act as if I am somebody else and I completely identify myself with that role. 1
13 When I recall my childhood, I have very vivid and lively memories. 1
14 I can recall many occurrences before the age of three. 1
15 When I perceive violence on television, I get so into it that I get really upset. 1
16 When I think of something cold, I actually get cold. 1

 

PLAYTESTER # _____2____
# QUESTION YES NO
1 As a child, I thought that the dolls, teddy bears and stuffed animals that I played with were living creatures. 1
2 As a child, I strongly believed in the existence of dwarfs, elves, and other fairy tale figures. 1
3 As a child, I had my own make believe friend or animal. 1
4 As a child, I could very easily identify with the main character of a story and/or movie. 1
5 As a child, I sometimes had the feeling that I was someone else (e.g.,a princess, an orphan, etc.). 1
6 As a child, I was encouraged by adults (parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters) to fully indulge myself in my fantasies and daydreams. 1
7 As a child, I devoted my time to playing a musical instrument, dancing, acting, and/or drawing. 1
8 I spend more than half the day (daytime) fantasizing or daydreaming. 1
9 Many of my friends and/or relatives do not know that I have such detailed fantasies. 1
10 Many of my fantasies are often just as lively as a good movie. 1
11 I am never bored because I start fantasizing when things get boring. 1
12 Sometimes I act as if I am somebody else and I completely identify myself with that role. 1
13 When I recall my childhood, I have very vivid and lively memories. 1
14 I can recall many occurrences before the age of three. 1
15 When I perceive violence on television, I get so into it that I get really upset. 1
16 When I think of something cold, I actually get cold. 1

 

PLAYTESTER # ____3_____
# QUESTION YES NO
1 As a child, I thought that the dolls, teddy bears and stuffed animals that I played with were living creatures. 1
2 As a child, I strongly believed in the existence of dwarfs, elves, and other fairy tale figures. 1
3 As a child, I had my own make believe friend or animal. 1
4 As a child, I could very easily identify with the main character of a story and/or movie. 1
5 As a child, I sometimes had the feeling that I was someone else (e.g.,a princess, an orphan, etc.). 1
6 As a child, I was encouraged by adults (parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters) to fully indulge myself in my fantasies and daydreams. 1
7 As a child, I devoted my time to playing a musical instrument, dancing, acting, and/or drawing. 1
8 I spend more than half the day (daytime) fantasizing or daydreaming. 1
9 Many of my friends and/or relatives do not know that I have such detailed fantasies. 1
10 Many of my fantasies are often just as lively as a good movie. 1
11 I am never bored because I start fantasizing when things get boring. 1
12 Sometimes I act as if I am somebody else and I completely identify myself with that role. 1
13 When I recall my childhood, I have very vivid and lively memories. 1
14 I can recall many occurrences before the age of three. 1
15 When I perceive violence on television, I get so into it that I get really upset. 1
16 When I think of something cold, I actually get cold. 1

 

By letting people take this test, I found the people have higher score tends to have more immersive experience. I had pretty high score myself in this test. Which means I should not trust myself in the play testing experience because I can get more immersed than others.

Final assignment

Final Assignment


Individual Project:

 

I really like to make games on unity, not only because I love playing computer games, but also when I create a game, I was like the “god” to make the rules. From when I was beginner to now, I already mastered how to make a simple games and how to make the game better by using other people’s assets on unity store. The difficult things I met a lot during making the game, first of all, when I tried to make something cool and watched Youtube video to learn, I cannot follow the guider because the selections are grey.. After searching a lot of ways to solve this problem, finally I got the solutions: the versions is different. So for some of the functions, the way to use it is totally different.

In my game, I set the first person controller in mars, so when you jump, it could reach very high place.Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.23.56 PM

People would like to explorer the new things, espiacilaly to climb the mountains. So I made several mountains, they are very cliffy, but if you are very careful to the details, you will find out that there is a “way“ which is not very cliffy, you can go through there.

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.13.50 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.12.53 PM

I used some yellow ball as the “guide” to show you the way to the end, and if you don’t eat the ball, you will die very soon because you do not have enough power.

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.12.53 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.13.50 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.23.56 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.31.26 PM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.32.33 PM

Then, when the player finally get to the top, they would see the word I left..

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 7.37.27 PM

It is funny because sometimes I put the yellow ball kind of far from you , so if you do not run very fast to eat the next one, you will die. Also, when you get to the top, there is no power ball to eat, you will die soon, too. hah

 

Group Project:

 

Here are some pictures about the game:

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.30.26 AM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.30.10 AM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.30.02 AM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.29.46 AM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.29.36 AM Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.29.24 AM

I am very happy to work with my teammate because we are all full of energy to finish it. All the work has been made methodically: we separate the work to find different objects, and then record the sounds, adjust the size of them. I really enjoy the process of making those things. The most enjoyed things in this game are those rotating people heads, they are very scary for some girls, especially when they are wearing VR device and stand alone in a dark room, I am ” enjoying” to see their reaction, it is so interesting.

To make this game, at the beginning I thought that if people wear HTC vive, they cannot see where the wall is in reality. So I made a mini map and put it on the right top corner. ( see the video here about mini map IMG_6662 ) When the player changes direction, the mini map will move at the same time. But later professor said the mini map might not be very useful because there will be blue lines around people to show them where the wall is. Also, people would not like to see a map around their eyes, so we cut it out.

Also, I made a toy room before Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.46.59 AMbecause at the very beginning we planned to just put some toys around the players and make sounds to let them find out where they are. Later we totally changed the style to ” scared” game, so the things should pop up when people go around the thing, and the environment should be very pure and dark like only black like this.Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 12.29.46 AM

I like our VR experience very much!

 

Here is the group design documentation:

Group Members: Baaria Chaudhary, Tyler Finley, Ma Teng

This experience is meant to create a sense of paranoid unease–with a desire to escape conflicting with a curiosity to explore–in the user.

CONCEPT :

  • User experiences feeling of the uncanny, discomfort, and overall creepiness–sort of like not being invited, not welcome.
  • User is immersed in darkness and must follow sounds in order to explore the world.
  • Department store in the middle of the night (tentative)

IMG_0632

THE RULES: GENERAL

  • Start at a certain point in the room
  • Follows sounds and environmental cues to trigger light events, that helps the user get an idea of where they are.
  • Can interact with some sounds, i.e. coffee maker (turn it off)
  • Ending experience ideally leading by light + sound cues to elevator which they enter and go down below to floor

 

ASSET REQUIREMENTS :

  • Visual assets for lights / department store objects
  • Sound cues
  • Work out user movement sounds (if any)
  • Environmental sounds (continuous)
  • Darkness
  • Space / room

 

Technical Assets:

  • Oculus rift
  • Sound plugins (3D)
  • Headphones
  • Good microphones
  • Leapmotion (if we choose to record user movements/track their space)
  • Controller (for turning off certain sounds)

 

Specific Components:

  • Silence
  • Coffee maker sound
  • Elevator sound
  • Whisper sound
  • Footsteps sound

Immersive Worlds – Cummulative

In this group project for Immersive Worlds, the team and I discussed together hat we wanted to do as our game. We really had a hard time choosing what kind of feeling the game wanted to induce because we couldn’t narrow it down. I thought the intangible feeling of just having a bad day where everything goes wrong was an apt description. So maybe that was despair? Anyhow, in the end we planned for our game to be a student who wakes up and finds himself or herself stuck inside the academic building at night and starts this quest to find the key to the exit. In the end, he’d manage to find a Public Safety official who’d hand them the key and they’d go out to find a new day has begun.

The first few weeks, we drew the game plans and layouts for the environment. We then started searching and collecting the assets for the game. These were then placed into the environment using Kate’s computer because hers was the only one that wasn’t crashing out or slowly down too much with Unity. Unfortunately mine kept crashing too much so I resorted to borrowing an external hard-drive form ATS to do any work with Unity.

For the group project, we had initial problems with making sure the assets we added didn’t fall out of the scene and stayed where we placed them. We had to re-upload some assets sometimes because this would happen despite the checks we’d put in place.

When we finished the environment, I started writing the scripts for the game. I added a tag and a script on the objects that we’d like our first person player to pick. I called them PickupObject and Pickupable. I also attached tags to these objects. I was able to do this using the ray-casting technique included in Unity. Our hugest problem was that every time we casted an object, it kind of disappeared like it had been destroyed. So we decided to just leave it at that and use a check that sees if all the objects with the tag Pickup had been found by the first person player. If they had and they only had one object left i.e. the key, then they’d be allowed to leave the game.

For some things though, we made our own textures and/or assets. Like we couldn’t get a good carpet texture so we took a picture of the ones at school and edited and color-corrected them to fit our world. We also borrowed Kyle’s Ricoh Theta S and went out and looked for a good background to make a skybox for our environment.

Kate had the idea of including the public safety guy in the game but this diverted from the original purpose of the game that just involved finding disasters in the game, so I suggested that we exclude him from the final game. In addition, we failed, in the time given, to accomplish our initial goal, which was to have animations in the game reacting to the users interactions with certain objects. We hope to be able to do it in the future, maybe in the summer when we have more time. For example, the popcorn busting into many pieces and the bathroom flooding.
Our hugest problems while doing this game were having Unity work well on more than one computer. It slowed down our process considerably. In addition, we inadvertently designed a world that was too big for our user. We thought that 600*600 was not too big, but it was really big so we had to scale all our objects and players into bigger sizes to seem realistic.

Personal Game w/ Kalkidan.

In the first class, we were all asked to download Unity to start learning how to build games in it. It was exciting but I guess my computer wasn’t as excited. I’m having a problem with space even though I’ve moved a lot of my documents to cloud. When it wasn’t being slow with Unity as we added assets, it was crashing. So since my neighbour had a much newer computer, we decided to do he class project together.

I think this was the most information-heavy class I had all semester. I’d never used Unity before or made virtual or game worlds. The possibilities are endless and learning about them each class was wonderful.

We created a 600*600 world like Christian for our class projects. Each week, we’d meet up with Kalkidan and go through the documentation for the class process that Christian had up on google docs to go through those instructions because sometimes (or rather quite often) it didn’t work out in class.

Due to the work that it took to go through Christian’s tutorials and sometimes trouble-shoot and use tutorials on Unity’s website, we decided to stick with the direction the class was taking and build our project on the base of Christian’s zombie game.

We especially had issues with getting the zombies to follow us around, and then activating the timer when we hit the safe zone around the bus. We tried to solve this in our meeting with Christian. All in all, I think my experience in the class and with Unity has taught me that even though I’m not a huge fan of video or console games, rendering engines like Unity can be used to make some cool games that I might like, just for testing purposes. I believe that the class was for me a break into a thing I would otherwise have had a huge barrier breaking into, in the beginning, it felt like the first time I was being taught how to use Adobe Suite, now I’m over the fear and believe that given time, I can even try to complete a real version of our group project and make it playable at the very least. I also especially learnt the very many uses of user testing, every tiny thing makes a difference. That is to say, as we made the games, things that as the designers we thought were obvious weren’t so much so to our friends that we gave to use the controls or do the actions in the games as we developed them. Learning to design not just for you, but the intended user is very important but not so intuitive.