Inflatables: Lab-Building a dome. Abubakar Zahid, Professor Mikesell

The website for the dimensions of gore calculator made it really convenient to make our gore. The website gave us the dimensions of the length and changing widths of the gore. Also, it gave us the number of gores we needed to make our dome. With all the given dimensions, the task we had to do was cut out the gores and then heat them using a heat sealer.

The plastic we used

Since the given calculations in the website also took into account the extra amount of plastic required to be used in sealing, unaware of this, we cut a greater length then the one mentioned in the calculations. This lead us to the slight problem of changing the dome like shape of our dome.

ima-vid

However, the lab was very useful in the sense that we learned the importance of cutting exact dimensions of plastics in order to make the desired shape of our inflatable and also to use the heat sealer more efficiently.

Inflatables: Class 9 Lab – Maya Wang, Professor Mikesell

For this class’ lab, we split into groups of 3 and put together an air pump with a valve that was controlled by Arduino, and later, an an air pressure sensor. The first part of the lab was to put together the air pump and valve, so we got out components which included: an AC adapter, a voltage converter, TIP 120 (not pictured), air pump, valve, diode, Arduino board, breadboard, and jumper cables. The air pressure sensor is pictured also, but we didn’t use it until the second part of the lab. I began by soldering some jumper wires to the pump so we could attach it to the breadboard. We followed a circuit diagram that was similar to the one pictured below, except instead of a resistor, there was a diode, and we had to include a voltage converter.

Before we could put any of the other components on the breadboard, we had to adjust the converter to output 6 volts so it would be the correct amount to power the circuit. We measured the voltage using a multimeter, then adjusted it accordingly.

We put the rest of the components on the board, following the diagram. The TIP 120 was the most confusing to wire, since the pins didn’t match up with the actual diagram we were given. We double checked the position of everything, and uploaded the example code. However, it didn’t work initially, only the pump was blowing air and the valve was not “clicking” like it was supposed to. We checked the wiring and code again, and found that 1. there was an extra “0” in the milliseconds of the example code, and 2. I had accidentally put one wire above the actual spot it was supposed to be in, which made the valve part of the circuit not closed. We fixed those two problems, and then the valve and pump worked.

The next part of the lab was to incorporate an air pressure sensor into the circuit, which I don’t have the circuit diagram for anymore. We just followed that by essentially wiring the digital pressure sensor to the Arduino. Once the example code was uploaded, the sensor began reading input. Regular human lungs couldn’t provide enough air pressure to make a large change in the serial readings, so we used a syringe to pressurize the air. The working air pressure sensor is shown in this video below.

//valve control

void setup() {
 // initialize digital pin LED_BUILTIN as an output.
 pinMode(6, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
 digitalWrite(6, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
 delay(1000); // wait for a second (There was an extra 0 in the example code which affected our initial attempt)
 digitalWrite(6, LOW); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
 delay(1000); // wait for a second
}

//pressure sensor

//Pressure sensor code

#include "Wire.h"
#include <Arduino.h>

#define sensor_I2C 0x28 // each I2C object has a unique bus address, the DS1307 is 0x68
#define OUTPUT_MIN 1638.4 // 1638 counts (10% of 2^14 counts or 0x0666)
#define OUTPUT_MAX 14745.6 // 14745 counts (90% of 2^14 counts or 0x3999)
#define PRESSURE_MIN 14.5 // min is 0 for sensors that give absolute values
#define PRESSURE_MAX 100 // 1.6bar (I want results in bar)
float psi = 0; // 14.5 psi is pressure at sea level

void setup()
{
 Wire.begin(); // wake up I2C bus
 delay (500);
 Serial.begin(9600);
}



void loop()
{
 float pressure, temperature;
 //send a request
 Wire.beginTransmission(sensor_I2C); // "Hey, CN75 @ 0x48! Message for you"
 Wire.write(1); // send a bit asking for register one, the data register (as specified by the pdf)
 Wire.endTransmission(); // "Thanks, goodbye..."
 // now get the data from the sensor
 delay (20);

Wire.requestFrom(sensor_I2C, 4);
 while (Wire.available() == 0);
 byte a = Wire.read(); // first received byte stored here ....Example bytes one: 00011001 10000000
 byte b = Wire.read(); // second received byte
 byte c = Wire.read(); // third received byte stored here
 byte d = Wire.read(); // fourth received byte stored here



byte status1 = (a & 0xc0) >> 6; // first 2 bits from first byte
 //Serial.println(status1, BIN);

int bridge_data = ((a & 0x3f) << 8) + b;
 int temperature_data = ((c << 8) + (d & 0xe0)) >> 5;



pressure = 1.0 * (bridge_data - OUTPUT_MIN) * (PRESSURE_MAX - PRESSURE_MIN) / (OUTPUT_MAX - OUTPUT_MIN) + PRESSURE_MIN;
 temperature = (temperature_data * 0.0977) - 50;



Serial.println(pressure);
 Serial.print("PSI ");

Serial.print("temperature (C) ");
 Serial.println(temperature);
 Serial.println("");

delay (500);
}

Week 5- Lab 4: Controlling and measuring air pressure sensors with arduino.

Partners: Maya Wang, Jimmy Kim

Materials: Valve, jumper cables, breadboard, LM2596S, diode, collector, micro air pump, Arduino.

Description: Build a system using Arduino that cycles through inflation and deflation.

Demos: 

 

Process: We soldered the air pump to two jumper cables. We connected the 12 volts supply to the breadboard. Then, we attached I+ to the 12 volt power, and I- to ground. Next, we connected the air pump to Out+, which is also connected to the Arduino’s V1n and to the valve.  The negative jumper cable of the valve is connected to the diode and to the middle pin of the collector. We attached the base of the collector to the digital input pin #6 of the Arduino, and the emitter to ground. The V1n to the pump and the pump, which is connected to ground. Valve is also connected to the 6 Voltz.

For the next circuit, we just added a pressure sensor. So the a4 and a5 were connected to the Arduino’s a4 and a5, accordingly. The pressure sensor’s power pin was then connected to the 5V in Arduino, and the ground was connected to ground.

 

 

Air bag.

Assignment 6 (Isabella)

With their rendering of the human body as a limp, flattened sack of skin, James Lomax’s inflatables for Me and My Friend (2011) call to mind Ed Atkins’ Safe Conduct Epidermal for Parkett (2016), pictured above. Atkins printed the UV map of an avatar in one of his videos onto a thick piece of rubber, creating what looks like a flayed section of human leather. While Atkins’ UV map is based on his own face, the labor involved in duplicating himself onto the avatar occurred mostly in the digital worlds of Photoshop and 3D modeling. The resulting leather is disturbing, but not for its resemblance to the artist himself. Lomax, however, physically set a mold of himself, spending six hours submerged in a plaster cast, creating a messy, tangible relationship between himself and his material.

The abject materiality of Lomax’s inflatable bodies achieves the same grotesque reaction as Safe Conduct Epidermal, or any other image of a decaying body. Me and My Friend is set apart because of the use of inflatables in the bodies: the two bodies alternately fill and deflate, mimicking not only breathing but reanimation of a corpse. The effect is particularly uncanny: the motion is like that of a breathing chest, but not quite. The bodies are like those of humans, but more visceral and unhinged. The installation shows us something that we fear, but it is tightly constrained to an air pump and two tubes.

 

Inflatables: Dome Lab

Materials and Tools:

Step 1: Measure out one gore based off of a 20 cm diameter that we agreed upon. We used an online gore calculator in order to get all of our measurements.

Step 2: Use the paper stencil to create 8 gores of the same size out of the plastic sheet.

Step 3: Use the iron to seal gores together in pairs. When 4 pairs are made, use the iron again to seal all of the pairs together, creating a plastic tarp without a bottom.

Step 4: Cut out a square of plastic based on the 20 cm diameter, fold it in half twice, and cut a curve in it from one corner to the other. You will be left with a circle.

 

 

 

 

Step 5: Use the iron to seal the circle to the tarp in order to form the bottom of the dome. Leave a tiny opening for a straw.

Step 6: Insert the straw into the opening and use the iron to seal the straw in place. Blow into the straw and there you have it, an inflatable dome!

 

 

Class 9: Lab 4 Air Pressure Sensors and Arduino | Maya Williams

Date: 19 April 2018

Group Members: Isabella Baranyk, Tyler Roman, and Maya Williams

Goal: Use Arduino to control and measure an air pressure sensor.

Materials:

  • Arduino
  • Breadboard
  • Wires
  • 6V power source
  • Air Pump
  • Valve
  • Voltage Regulator
  • TIP 120 transistor
  • Diode
  • Pressure Sensor
  • Inflatable square of TPU coated fabric

Process:

Following the schematics given to us as a group of three, Tyler, Isabella, and I constructed two circuits with the materials provided. The first circuit is designed to cycle through high and low states, inflating and deflating an attached inflatable.

      

The valve we used requires 6 volts from a secondary power source (not the Arduino) so we used the digital multimeter to ensure that the voltage output was correct before plugging the circuit into any power sources. To adjust the voltage there is a small screw in the voltage regulator that can be turned with a small screwdriver or a fingernail.

  

While this was going on Tyler was also soldering two wires onto the air pump so it could be connected to the breadboard.

After constructing the circuit and connecting the air pump to the valve with some small plastic tubing we attached the inflatable square made of TPU coated fabric to the valve and successfully inflated it. However, it did not deflate. After a few moments of scratching our heads, we realized we had not plugged into the secondary power source. Once we did this the circuit successfully inflated and deflated the bag. In the video below you can hear the valve clicking which is an indication of successful airflow.

For the second part of this lab, we added a pressure sensor to our circuit. Then, after inputting the second provided Arduino code for pressure sensing, we connected a syringe to the open end of the valve with some more plastic tubing. By compressing the syringe we were able to observe the change in pressure on the serial monitor. The maximum pressure we were able to reach was slightly above 30. You can see some video of this below.

  

 

// Code to Control Valve
void setup() {
 // initialize digital pin LED_BUILTIN as an output.
 pinMode(6, OUTPUT);
}

// the loop function runs over and over again forever
void loop() {
 digitalWrite(6, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level)
 delay(10000); // wait for a second
 digitalWrite(6, LOW); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW
 delay(1000); // wait for a second
}





//Pressure sensor code

#include "Wire.h"
#include <Arduino.h>

#define sensor_I2C 0x28 // each I2C object has a unique bus address, the DS1307 is 0x68
#define OUTPUT_MIN 1638.4 // 1638 counts (10% of 2^14 counts or 0x0666)
#define OUTPUT_MAX 14745.6 // 14745 counts (90% of 2^14 counts or 0x3999)
#define PRESSURE_MIN 14.5 // min is 0 for sensors that give absolute values
#define PRESSURE_MAX 100 // 1.6bar (I want results in bar)
float psi = 0; // 14.5 psi is pressure at sea level

void setup()
{
 Wire.begin(); // wake up I2C bus
 delay (500);
 Serial.begin(9600);
}



void loop()
{
 float pressure, temperature;
 //send a request
 Wire.beginTransmission(sensor_I2C); // "Hey, CN75 @ 0x48! Message for you"
 Wire.write(1); // send a bit asking for register one, the data register (as specified by the pdf)
 Wire.endTransmission(); // "Thanks, goodbye..."
 // now get the data from the sensor
 delay (20);

Wire.requestFrom(sensor_I2C, 4);
 while (Wire.available() == 0);
 byte a = Wire.read(); // first received byte stored here ....Example bytes one: 00011001 10000000
 byte b = Wire.read(); // second received byte
 byte c = Wire.read(); // third received byte stored here
 byte d = Wire.read(); // fourth received byte stored here



byte status1 = (a & 0xc0) >> 6; // first 2 bits from first byte
 //Serial.println(status1, BIN);

int bridge_data = ((a & 0x3f) << 8) + b;
 int temperature_data = ((c << 8) + (d & 0xe0)) >> 5;



pressure = 1.0 * (bridge_data - OUTPUT_MIN) * (PRESSURE_MAX - PRESSURE_MIN) / (OUTPUT_MAX - OUTPUT_MIN) + PRESSURE_MIN;
 temperature = (temperature_data * 0.0977) - 50;



Serial.println(pressure);
 Serial.print("PSI ");

Serial.print("temperature (C) ");
 Serial.println(temperature);
 Serial.println("");

delay (500);
}

Inflatables: Class 8 Lab – Maya Wang, Professor Mikesell

In this lab, we separated into groups and created an inflatable dome. My partners were Tyler Roman and Matthew Couch. We first gathered our materials, a sheet of plastic, some scissors, cardboard, a marker, and a handheld iron. The dome’s gores had to be calculated, so we used the application found on http://www.domerama.com/calculators/cover-pattern/. Using a ruler, marker, and cardboard, we created a template for the gores. We just copied the measurements at each increment and cut out the shape it created. The next step was to trace the pattern onto the plastic sheet we were making the dome out of.

The diameter of our dome was going to be about 50 cm, so we used a little more material than the other groups. We also calculated it so that our dome would have 8 gores, so we had to trace and cut more pieces as well. After cutting out all of the pieces, we used the handheld iron to heat seal the gores together, right sides together like in sewing. I did most of the ironing and made sure that the seams were completely sealed.

When we flipped our dome right side out, it resembled a soup dumpling, or more accurately, a breast. Either way, we continued by creating a base for the dome, using a makeshift compass to trace a circle onto another sheet of plastic. Ironing the circle to the perimeter of the dome was a little more difficult since it was round, but we managed to seal it completely. We left a small opening for inflation, and even though the circle was a little too large, we folded over a part of it to make the perimeter of the circle smaller. The “straw” for inflating the dome was the last part, we took some leftover plastic and cut a rectangle, folded it, and ironed it to make it. We attached the straw to the dome using tape since it would’ve been hard to heat seal it. I inflated the dome, and it looked even more like a soup dumpling/breast after inflation. I’d say we were pretty successful in making a dome-like structure, and it held up pretty well on its own.

Documentation 4: Controlling and Measuring Air Pressure

This lab had two parts. The first involved following a schematic to create a circuit with a pump that cycled through low and high states, like the Arduino BLINK tutorial, except with air instead of an LED.

Because the valve that we used required 6 volts from a separate power source, we checked and adjusted the voltage with a multimeter before completing and powering up the whole circuit.

We attached a small bladder made of TPU-coated fabric to the valve to check that it was working correctly. The high and low states each ran for one second, which likely would have been too short a time to fill any larger inflatable, but this small one was able to inflate completely in the allotted amount of time.

The next portion of the lab involved adding a pressure sensor to the existing circuit. We attached  a syringe to the sensor and pushed air towards it, seeing in the serial box how much pressure we were applying. 30 seemed to be about the max.

Documentation 3: Making a Dome

 

For this lab, we created a plastic dome using a template from this free gore calculator. Using a calculator like this totally removes the time-consuming process of figuring out how large each gore should be and how many are needed to make the dome. The material required to make even a dome with a relatively small diameter was more than we expected, so we ended up having to cut our original dome size in half in order to have enough plastic to produce the gores.

After getting the initial measurements from our calculator, we carefully measured and cut a cardboard template and traced the shape onto eight pieces of plastic.

Because the calculator only leaves a few millimeters of space on the gore edges for the heat sealing seam, any measuring and cutting had to be as exact as possible. To put the gores together and create the dome, we used a handheld heat-sealer over parchment paper to prevent the plastic from melting onto the surface of the iron. We ended up sealing way too close to the edges of the cores, making the seam unstable and eventually causing it to pull apart.

Because of the super skinny seams, our final dome was too delicate to turn inside out and hide the seams, and we had a lot of holes that prevented it from sealing and inflating properly. Interestingly, the seams we did have provided a sort of ribbing that allow the finished shape to still appear somewhat dome-like even without direct inflation.

Inflatables | Lab 3 – Making a Dome [Matthew Couch]

Date: 2018-04-17

Lab name: Making a Dome

Teammates: Matthew Couch, Maya Wang, Tyler Roman

Intro:

In this lab we created an inflatable “dome” (dome-like object, anyways) using heat-sealed plastic.

Materials:

  • Scissors
  • Tape
  • Marker
  • Plastic (from the first lab)
  • Tracing paper
  • Heat sealer
  • Cardboard
  • Meter stick

 

 

Process:

First, we had to decide both the size of the dome and the number of gores it would have. To get the correct measurements, we used the Excel program provided in the PowerPoint.

We decided on a 50cm diameter and 8 gores (the lab required a minimum of 6). The measurements that the Excel program provided us are shown in the picture to the left.

 

 

 

 

After we had the measurements, we had to create a gore-template using the cardboard (as it would provide a sturdier surface to trace around compared to say, paper). Here is both the drawing and cutting of the cardboard gore-template. First, the height was drawn down the middle of the cardboard. Next, each width (there were 5 intervals between the bottom and the top point) was divided by two in order to center the interval. For example, if the width at interval 1 of height 1.9cm was 3cm, then from the middle line we would go each way 1.5cm (3cm/2).

The next step was to trace the gore-template onto the plastic eight times (the number of gores we would use) and cut them out. The market outline would prove useful later on when heat sealing the gores together.

Now, we had to heat seal all of the gores together. It was important not to hold the heat sealer on one part for too long, otherwise it might cause tears in the plastic, leading air to leak out when the product was inflated.

With the top of the dome completed, we lacked a base and a way to get air into the dome and inflate it. Knowing the diameter of the dome, we could use a compass with a 25cm measurement (the radius of our dome) to create the base. To account for the sealing that would be done, we created a base a little larger than what was actually needed and cut off some of the excess at the end. After cutting the base out, we heat sealed the base of each gore to the outer edge of the circle, leaving only a small piece not sealed in order to 1) flip the piece inside-out (so that the seams would be inside, leading to a more “aesthetic” dome) and 2) allow for us to attach the piece that would let us blow air in.

Now all we had to do was create a piece that would allow us to blow air into the dome. To do this, we simply heat sealed a rectangular piece of plastic and then flipped it inside out. Due to time constraints (and not wanting to deal with the stress of heat sealing it to an open hole, something that seems overly difficult), we taped it to the opening in the dome.

 

 

 

 

Here is a few pictures and a final video displaying the completed dome (actually worked out pretty well except for the pointed top).

Here is the video of Maya blowing the dome up:

Overall the project went really well and I think it should help me a bit when it comes to my final project.