UX Design| Amber Wang & Theresa Lin| Wireframe, Mockups and Usability Test

Project: 3D Cake Lab

Instructor: Azure Qian

Documented by: Amber Wang and Theresa Lin

1. Wireframe Update

After the first draft version of wireframe using pencil and paper, this week, we started to design the second version of our wireframe using the software Adobe XD. We have made changes to our previous user flow. The latest version looks as follows:

2. Mockups

To align with the topic of cake, we decided to use blue and pink as our main and secondary colors. We chose our two colors from color-hex.com/color-palettes/. The hex values are #D6FCFF and #ff8080. We also used Piktochart to edit our interface background. We added the effect of colorful short lines because it resembles the toppings on a cake. We also made our main design interface as follows.

                   

3. Usability Test

Some really important feedback were given through user testing especially on our first prototype. In our first prototype, the option to choose the cake flavor and frosting was at the beginning and each in a separate page. Some users were concerned that towards the end if they wanted to change the cake flavor or frosting, they’d have to go all the way back to the beginning and lose progress on other choices. On the design interface, some users also preferred to have already finished designs as options to drag and drop on the cake rather than design the entire cake from scratch. Users also pointed out that there was no payment page on our first prototype. We then incorporated a payment page and the delivery section on one. Overall users said our app was generally easy to understand and navigate.

We did another round of user testing on our second prototype. We have received many feedbacks and good suggestions for our 3D design interface. A common impression of this interface to users is that it is childish cartoonish. They could immediately be indicated that they were supposed to tap and dragged the basic 3D shapes to the interface. However, some have concern that they couldn’t properly position the shapes on the cake. And it would be better if there’s an auto-filling options, like cube holes on different places of the cake for user to put in the shapes they chose, which could give them a better proportion and position which is aesthetic. Some also suggests to change the interface to be more realistic, like a real cake. Users have the concern that a cartoonish interface may be misleading and they want to know how the real cake look like. They suggest that the 3D shapes on the tool bars should also look like realistic cake components. Another suggestion come from the users is to have a search bar on the top of the 3D shapes tool bar for users to type in the shapes they want. eg. flowers, dogs, etc.

This is a demo video of one usability test we conducted.

first half second half

UXD- User Flow, Survey/Interview, Persona- Amber Wang and Theresa Lin

Class: User Experience Design

Instructor: Azure Qian

Documented by: Amber Wang and Theresa Lin

User Flow Map:

We used Lucidchart to create our user flow map.

Our app that pairs up with the cafe will first start off with a screen that prompts the user to clicks a button to start designing. The user will then have to choose the cake size, the amount of layers they want, and the flavor of the cake and icing. Then the app will go to the design interface in which the user will design the cake. After that, the user will be able to choose if they want to upload their design for a weekly ranking or not. Then the user can choose if they want the cake to be delivered, pick-up, or if they’re in the cafe to start the 3D printing as soon as possible. If they chose delivery, they will be directed to a screen for address and phone number input, time they want the cake delivered, and options to choose any addition service they need such as candles, or utensils. If they chose pick-up, they will be directed to a screen that asks what time they want to pick it up at what location as well as options for additional service. If the customers are in the cafe and want the design to be printed then and there, they will be shown a order number and the count-down time to when the printing will start. The last screen will show when the order is completed.

User Research:

Survey: wjx.cn/m/35090148.aspx

Survey Results:

On average, people are willing to pay 82.97 RMB extra for the customization service.

Persona:

App Redesign

In last week’s class, we helped redesign a global language tutoring App called PopOn. We first used stickers to categorize the features of the App under different big categories. There are mainly 5 big categories, which are Globe, Training, Video, Message, My Profile. However, the small features under the 5 big categories are too broad and disorganized. For example, there’s one branch under Messages called Clan, in which user could explore different clans, view clan’s posts and do group tasks. We thought it didn’t make sense to have such broad exploration under the name of “message”. Another two features unreasonably included under “My Profile” are “history call” and “plans (learning target)”. We believe that it would be easier for users to view their history call in the same interface of making the calls under “Globe”. And “learning target” should go with “Training” so that users can get a better idea of their training plans.

Please refer to our App Redesign Before and After as follows:

Callum and Catt | User Research + Personas + Questions

For the next step of this interactive process of creating a portfolio, we were tasked with understanding our user. In order to do this we had to do a few key tasks including:

  1. Create Questions and separate them into two different sections. One for Quantitive data or numerical data them demonstrates the who, what, when, and where. The other for Qualitative data is non numerical data that shows you the why and how.
  2. Interview different types of users and conduct a survey.
  3. Create personas of who we believe our users are.

STEP 1

Quantitative Research

Questions

  1. What is your gender?
    1. Male
    2. Female
    3. Other/prefer not to say
  2. What is your age?
    1. <18
    2. 18-25
    3. 26-35
    4. 36-45
    5. 46-55
    6. 56+
  3. What is your profession?
    1. Student
    2. Unemployed
    3. Type in
  4. What is your current income?
    1. 0-4999 USD
    2. 5000-14,999 USD
    3. 15,000-39,999 USD
    4. 40,000-59,999 USD
    5. 60,000-79,999 USD
    6. 80,000-99,999 USD
    7. 100,000+ USD
    8. Prefer not to answer
  5. How often do you go to museums?
    1. Every week or more
    2. 1-2 times a month
    3. A few times a year
    4. Only when on vacation/in a new place
    5. A few times in my life
    6. Never
  6. Do you mostly go to museums
    1. In the city/place you are living
    2. While on vacation/somewhere new
    3. Both
    4. Never
  7. What type of museum do you usually go to (check all that apply)?
    1. Art/design
    2. Science/technology
    3. History
    4. Oceanographic
    5. Folklore/culture
    6. Other
  8. How often do you bring your smartphone when you go to museums?
    1. Always
    2. Most of the time
    3. Sometimes
    4. Never
  9. Have you ever had an audio guide or tour of a museum?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  10. If yes, what did you like about the experience?
  11. If yes, what did you dislike about the experience?
  12. Overall, do you enjoy having some guidance in museums?
    1. Yes
    2. No
  13. What aspects would you like in an audio/tour guide? (Mark all that apply)
    1. Personalized guides that cater to what you like
    2. History
    3. Context/culture
    4. Guidance/recommendations of where to go within the museum
    5. Easy to listen to/not boring or jargon-y
    6. In depth guide to the whole museum
    7. “Cliffnotes” guide that only shows you the highlights in a short amount of time
  14. If free, would you use an audio guide app on your smartphone?
    1. Yes
    2. No

Results 

 

 

 

Qualitative Research (Interviews)

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
  2. How often do you go to museums?
  3. What type of museums do you go to?
  4. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
  5. Do you think audio/tour guides are helpful in general (even if you don’t use them)? Why or why not?
  6. What aspects are most important to you in an audio/tour guide?
    1. Personalized guides that cater to what you like
    2. History
    3. Context/culture
    4. Guidance/recommendations of where to go within the museum
    5. Easy to listen to/not boring or jargon-y
    6. In depth guide to the whole museum
    7. “Cliffnotes” guide that only shows you the highlights in a short amount of time
  7. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
  8. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?

STEP 2

PUJA (Interview 1)

I have the audio tapes as well, but they are around 10mb and take too long to upload to the server, so here are the notes

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
    1. Puja Chandramohan, 21, employed in a marketing position
  2. How often do you go to museums?
    1. I would say once every two months, approximately
    2. If I’m traveling then it’s at least once/trip

How often do you travel?

Every time I get a break, usually a few weeks in the summer or in the winter

  1. What type of museums do you go to?
    1. In Shanghai, or the place that I’m living longterm, I’m usually more interested in art or culture…. Especially if they’re pop up museums, just to see something new. But if Im traveling, I’m more interested in the history, but im also open to famous art museums
  2. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
    1. Yes, not always, but there have times where I have opted to … partake.
    2. Yeah, I can’t recall a time where I’ve ever been unhappy with a tour. I’ve almost always felt the tour guide was offering insight you couldn’t just read off the walls or look up online. There were usually… with the tour guide that’s when you can get to know the lesser known facts about the site. It’s easier to understand… if you have limited time, what are the spots you should go see for sure. With the audioguide you kind of are in more control
  3. Do you think audio/tour guides are helpful in general (even if you don’t use them)? Why or why not?
    1. I would say yes. I also think it depends, cause I know a fair amount of people that do enjoy researching on their own, and are very well educated on the place that they’re visiting, so I’ve traveled with companions that don’t like or they end up questioning the validity of what’s being said by a tour guide. With an audioguide it’s hosted by the site and it’s usually info that’s more common knowledge, I think that’s what differentiates the two. I’m personally not one that will research too much into the site
  4. What aspects are most important to you in an audio/tour guide?
    1. If you have limited time, you’re getting a lot of engagement, a tour guide is friendly, makes it less complex, like an expedited cliffnotes version where you can get to know quickly, and in a much more friendly manner what sites you should see…. It’s a lot easier than having a monotone voice, going on fora long time, and reading off the walls. I think that was the biggest take away for me. And sometimes I’ve had a couple experiences where teh tour guides have shown me secret places and stuff. You just gotta be lucky.
  5. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
    1. I would use it. I feel like my phone’s always on me anyways, and if you’re allowed to take pictures it would be easy to [use] it with one hand
  6. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?
    1. I would say, maybe like options that are available to the user, like if they want to focus more on the history, or if they wan to know art and cultural facts, and definitely an option for an expedited tour, like “oh i just want to know the big places to go so i can cross this off my bucket list”

Helena (Interview 2)

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
    1. Helena Ma, 21, full time student
  2. How often do you go to museums?
    1. Not very often, only when I travel. I go to museums like 2-3 times a year
  3. What type of museums do you go to?
    1. All kinds, science, art, history. Art
  4. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
    1. I have but it was only through like school trips where it was required. Personally I just don’t have the interest in a lot of the exhibits/art, so when the guides talk about it they talk about it for a really long time cause they’re really passionate, so i get bored after the first 3 sentences
  5. Do you think audio/tour guides are helpful in general (even if you don’t use them)? Why or why not?
    1. Yeah, I think it’s good fo the people that would share the same passion and is really truly interested, it’s nice to have someone who has the knowledge
  6. What aspects are most important to you in an audio/tour guide?
    1. The only audioguides i’ve ever experience were really old, clunky, outdated, they seemed dirty, they were very mundane and boring and monotone. You walk up to the exhibit, you click the button of the exhibit and they give you a brief description. There’s definitely ways to make them more interesting, I just find them boring. Cause there’s still a written description next to it so you can just read it
  7. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
    1. No
  8. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?
    1. Interactive. I guess that’s about it.
    2. I think the whole interactive thing rn is getting big, like Bandersnatch, so if an audioguide- like if there was some kind of game within the audioguide, like the option to play a game within the museum
    3. Otherwise museums is just walking around.

LUCA (Interview 3) 

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
    1. My name is Luca, I’m 23, and I’m a student
  2. How often do you go to museums?
    1. I think once or twice a month, maybe, but I only go to things that interest me.
  3. What type of museums do you go to?
    1. I like history museums a lot, talk about specific topics, I usually don’t go to random museums just to see like art. If it’s not a specific event I usually don’t go.
  4. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
    1. Sometimes I do. I find them helpful if they have like preset tours where they tell you where to move around, especially if it’s a big museum, I don’t find them useful if you just have to walk around and whenever you are in front of something you press something. [I like when] they recommend you, give you directions.
    2. I like when they recommend you and also when they have different tours for different interests and also when they have tours that explore, like particular aspects of the museum, particular artists, when there’s a theme behind what I’m doing.
  5. How often do you use audio guides at museums?
    1. Usually depends if it’s included in the ticket or not.
  6. Have you ever paid for an audio guide?
    1. No
  7. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
    1. Yeah, I would definitely use it. I mean, if it needs internet access, I don’t know if I would use it. But yeah I would definitely use it, it’s comfortable it’s on your phone, you can hear it just with your headphones.
  8. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?
    1. Maybe have a map, besides just a guide, of the museum on it

FLOYD (Interview 4) 

 

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
    1. Floyd Son, study in Shanghai, 22
  2. How often do you go to museums?
    1. In mainland China, i don’t really go, but when im visiting other countries, i’ll go. Maybe like 10 times/year
  3. What type of museums do you go to?
    1. I vary. I tend to go to art museums than anything else
  4. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
    1. No.
  5. Do you think audio/tour guides are helpful in general (even if you don’t use them)? Why or why not?
    1. I don’t think so unless… unless you’re actually disabled it might come in handy.
    2. No i still don’t think it’s useful. Cause if you know about all the art pieces… if you know about it, you already know about it.
    3. I’ve never used one in my life. When I see people walking around with audio sets I thought it was kind of dumb.
  6. What aspects are most important to you in an audio/tour guide?
  7. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
    1. No
  8. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?
    1. If they had it i would try it out and see what the difference is, and my opinion
    2. Probably recs on what to see in the museum and brief summary about, in this case, artwork and the artist. Something like that.

CHRISTOPHER (INTERVIEW 5) 

  1. What is your name, age, and occupation?
    1. 20, Christopher, currently working on business in shanghai
  2. How often do you go to museums?
    1. Only when i travel with my family, 4-5 in a year, maybe 7
  3. What type of museums do you go to?
    1. Mostly contemporary or old masters (art musems)
  4. Have you ever had an audio/tour guide in a museum? Did you find it helpful? Why or why not?
    1. No
  5. Do you think audio/tour guides are helpful in general (even if you don’t use them)? Why or why not?
    1. I could see why people use them, i just personally don’t, i enjoy just more reading about paintings i like rather than dealing with the whole audiobook system
  6. What aspects are most important to you in an audio/tour guide?
    1. Just like what to see, easy user interface. I know they’re pretty cheap pieces of technology, so just user interface in general
  7. If there was a free audio guide app on your phone would you use it? Why or why not?
    1. Yeah probably for like certain museums or exhibitions, if it’s something im really interested
  8. Are there any features you can think of that you’d want?
    1. I think downloadable, probably other info about the museum like opening hours, rules, fees, an overview of the museum

Again, I have the entire audio recordings, but they take too long to upload.

 

Part 3

 

Dear Data Shanghai–Ann(Candy)

This is a map that I made to note down my feelings in different weather in Shanghai during the last week. It provided information of how strong the wind is and how is the weather and also my feelings. My inspiration comes from the complaints about the rainy days I heard in the past week(It really rains a lot).

To directly present myself, I drew 7 little characters, representing myself in the seven days. They all have similar outfit for this is not my focus. The weather is straight forward: with five days raining , one day with clouds and one day in the sun. The wind on the other hand is shown through the character’s hair and the angle of the umbrella she is holding. I made the umbrella yellow so that the map looks better. It seldom keeps rainy for so long time in Februry in Shanghai. For me I do not feel so comfortable when it rains since my shoes would get wet and it would be sultry even indoor. I drew some black dots ahead of the 5 characters in the rain to express my resigned feelings, and of course the dots keeping accumulating. On the last two days on my map which sun starts to come out. There grows a little plant on the head of the girl to represent her happiness. It feel like a cute and efficient way to map my feeling in this way.

BIRS Lab 1

Research

Wolfram’s findings in “A New Kind of Science” arrived at a very crucial point; that simple programs have the ability and potential to produce complex, irregular behaviors. He came to this finding, known as Rule 30, through his experiments on generating patterns from providing the computer with a set of simple rules, or cellular automata. An interesting application of cellular automata would be modeling simulations of forest fires, which was explored in a 2018 study (Rui et al). Combining cellular automata and previous forest fire simulation models allows one to map out the spatiotemporal impact of a forest fire, and if reversed, trace the root locations of a fire.

 

Code Examples

  1. Simple Cellular Automaton (Python)

  1. Multiplexed 2D Cellular Automata (Scratch MIT)

  1. Rock-Paper-Scissors Cellular Automata (Scratch MIT)

Tinkering

I modified the Rock-Paper-Scissors Cellular Automata created on Scratch MIT. The rules of the cellular automaton were according to color, (paper = green, scissors = blue, rock = purple) and the frequency of the dots were according to the delay that we could adjust. I played around with it and created different colorful patterns, after which I then decided to switch the rules. I changed the colors corresponding to rock, paper, and scissors respectively. This yielded the same results as the original project, but with different colors.

 

Reflection

I found that cellular automata are very much like early adaptations of computer programs mimicking living organisms. Like the cellular automata examples shown, living organisms are based on very simple rules and need very little to survive but evolve into irregular, complex beings. I thought Scratch MIT was a good introduction to tinkering, and I enjoyed making variations of the cellular automaton.

Main File.

Programming design:

Title: Interact to Expose.                                           Title: Programming the wild.

     

Title: Pilgrimage and brainstorming.                          Title: Warm smell of tea.

          

 

Film and Animation

《竹石——立根原在破岩中》(bamboo of the stone)

 

《编码与自然互动》

Design with hardware: 

Title: 3D model water wheel liquid trash can prototype

     

Title: under the night light

 

 

Recitation 10: Making a Media Controller-Rahmon Chapoteau (Leon)

For this recitation, I wanted to make a controller that would control the size of the circles in the processing sketch, which would make the live video look either more or less pixelated. The first thing I tired to do was make and control the color and placement of rectangles since I still did not really understand serial communication between Arduino and Processing:

 

After I had a better understanding of this, I got a lot of help from the fellows on how to fill the screen with the circles/pixels, and multiply them as I moved my potentiometer. Although I had trouble understanding how to fill the screen with circles based on how much the potentiometer moved, I did start to have a better understanding of the serial communication between Arduino and Processing. Here is the final result of my project:

Processing 

import processing.video.*;
Capture cam;

int sizeX = 10;

int sizeY = 10;

import processing.serial.*;


Serial myPort;
int valueFromArduino;

void setup() {
  size(640, 480);
  cam = new Capture(this, 640, 480);
  cam.start();
  myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[ 3 ], 9600);
}

void draw() {
   while ( myPort.available() > 0) {
    valueFromArduino = myPort.read();
    println(valueFromArduino);
  }
  
  if (cam.available()) {
    cam.read();
    //can load pixels of camera input
    //just like how we load pixels of an image
    cam.loadPixels();

    int sizeArduino = int(map(valueFromArduino, 0, 255, 5, 20));
    int w = cam.width;
    int h = cam.height;
    for (int y = 0; y < h; y +=sizeArduino) {
      for (int x = 0; x < w; x+=sizeArduino) {


        int i =  x + y*w; // *** IMPORTANT ***

        float r =  red(cam.pixels[i]); 
        float g =  green(cam.pixels[i]);
        float b = blue(cam.pixels[i]);
        float brightness = map(mouseX, 0, width, 0, 255);
        //cam.pixels[i] = color(r+brightness, g+brightness, b+brightness); 

        fill(r, g, b);
        ellipse(x, y, sizeArduino, sizeArduino);


        //include size variable. 
        //if mouseX > ..., decrease size 


        //if ((mouseX <160)) {
        //  sizeX = 5;
        //  sizeY = 5;
        //} else if ((mouseX > 160) && (mouseX <320)) {

        //  sizeX = 10;
        //  sizeY = 10;
        //  //ellipse(x, y, sizeX, sizeY);
        //} else if ((mouseX > 160) && (mouseX <320)) {

        //  sizeX = 10;
        //  sizeY = 10;
        //  //ellipse(x, y, sizeX, sizeY);
        //} else if ((mouseX >320) && (mouseX <480)) {

        //  sizeX = 15;
        //  sizeY = 15;
        //} else if ((mouseX >480) && (mouseX <640)) {
        //  sizeX = 20;
        //  sizeY = 20;
        //}



        //1023 highest for potentiometer, can use map
      }
    }
    cam.updatePixels();
  }
}

//void captureEvent(Capture cam) {
//  cam.read();
//}

Week 15: Internet Art project – Abdi (Chen)

Title: BRAND NEW WORLD

Linkhttp://imanas.shanghai.nyu.edu/~kap633/final-website/

Partner: Katie Pellegrino

Conception & Design:

In designing our internet art project, Katie and I wanted to mock/comment on our 21st century brand-obsessed consumer culture. We began by posing the question: “Why do people care about brands and logos?” Our inquiry lead us to hypothesize that it isn’t necessarily the products that people are pursuing. But rather the feelings that they derive from wearing visible branding. So we sought to tap into these base pursuits by creating an ironic webshop where we would sell consumers the feelings they’re after without needing to buy the product. (“Skip the product cop the feeling!”) We came up with the name ‘BRAND NEW WORLD‘, which we thought was a clever play on words on the dystopic social satire novel by Aldous Huxley, ‘BRAVE NEW WORLD’.

Process:

When building our project, Katie and I sat and discussed how we wanted this webshop to look. We were really fascinated by the aesthetics and sketchy look of early 2000s websites, and the nostalgia that they evoked. So we aimed to design our webshop to be simple and tacky in its visual design. We went with Times New Roman for the title and all the headers because that was the go-to font for many websites back then; and also a bright blue for the text color against a pale yellow background because we felt that looked pretty 2002-ish. We used an image of a web browser from back then to build our webshop within, but used Photoshop to adjust it and add functions that would work with and fit our site. Katie took the lead on the technical web construction. I took took the lead on the visual assets. I used Adobe Illustrator to distort brand logos into the underlying feelings that they might give to their consumers. (Champion > Cool, Rolls Royce > Really Rich). To give our site a more retro feel, we implemented GIFs that were blatantly consumer-centric (dollar signs, ‘I LOVE SHOPPING’, ETC.) . We initially were stuck about how we would convey our idea of buying the feelings while reflecting the actual brands. During user testing, we received feedback that our project wasn’t entirely clear that it was supposed to be a webshop, and were suggested to add pricing and a checkout process to better convey it. One night while working on our project, we had an epiphany that it would be cool to juxtapose the original logos against the twisted logos of the feelings by perfectly fading into the feeling when hovered over, and adding prices that were were significantly cheaper that the actual relative price ranges of the brands’ products. The prices of the feelings that we’re selling go significantly down to reflect the “cheap feelings” that buying things give us. When checking out, users click the cart button which redirects them to an article on the psychological effect of purchasing luxury goods.

Future:

Upon receiving feedback, we probably should have been a bit less obvious with the irony and allowed users to think it was a real webshop and, after exploring the site a bit, discover that “Oh! this is actually not a real webshop, but an art piece.” I also would have loved to expand our “product inventory”. We did want to add more than just 3 items for each category. But unfortunately, time did not allow for the creation of more visual assets. In the future, I imagine there to be at least 9 per category, enough for the user to scroll while browsing.

 

Overall, I am very satisfied with how our project turned out, and how well Katie and I were able to execute it. Our final product looked almost exactly how I imagined it to look in my head since day 1 and our initial rough sketch on graph paper,

 

 

Working with Electrons Actuator and Sensor lab Coneys

For the actuator and sensor lab I built a circuit where a laser fires into a light detector that then turns on a buzzer. Everything was powered by a simple battery pack, the laser and sensor were connected to the power and then the output of the photoelectric sensor was sent to a basic buzzer that buzzes whenever powered. However the output of the photoelectric sensor wasn’t enough to drive the buzzer so even though the laser was being detected it was unable to buzz. I considered different method for stepping up the voltage until Professor Rudi swapped the source from the output of the electric sensor to its ground. The sink current of the sensor was strong enough to power the buzzer and was only activated when the sensor detected light. This blew my mind because I had previously not known about sink currents and didn’t understand how a ground could be used like an output.

Working with Electrons 555 Lab (Coneys)

Creating the an astable 555 circuit was pretty interesting. I know how to do lots of timing stuff based off a micro-controller but it was cool to learn how to hard code it. The main functions like vcc, ground, threshold, and trigger were pretty easy to understand but some of the other pins I still don’t quite understand. Our circuit was designed in a similar fashion to this in astable mode so that it could oscillate and blink the light  without an input.

Then in class together we built an EAGLE schematic for a 555 lighting circuit PCB. The initial simulation section was pretty straightforward but then arranging it on the actual board once you had simulated it was a little more complex. It wasn’t quite clear to me what placements would or wouldn’t work in actual practice and when different layers should be used. The auto placement function seemed sufficient for our needs but I suspect that it falls off pretty hard as circuit complexity increases.

The manufacturing process was pretty interesting, I was surprised at how different it was in our lab vs at an industrial scale. We had some trouble with the milling when we tried to construct it , maybe at some point the wrong tip was used but other than that it seemed fairly straightforward. A lot of the difficulty seems to come with positioning stuff on the board but also the board in the machine and on the software. Any misalignment on any of these levels could break it so it seemed really important to check all your measurements well.