Case Study Reflection

Case: a 53-year-old man who could only lift his head and shoulder but not talk wants to communicate with family and friends

Group Members: Ewa and Nora

Final Presentation:  https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1tjYTKFaNvsFXd8VoLw_9cwRHB9BMVNnQ-bFhq-oGzPc/edit?usp=sharing

I. Process:

Stage 1: Brainstorming : 

At first the case appeared to be hard to me because what our subject can do is really limited. Also since we might not be able to prototype really high-tech solutions, it seemed there were not a lot of options. So what we came up with first is the low-tech laser pointing device, which was inspired by the on market picture board.  But then it was too simple and the functions were really limited. So on the day that we had our 6th class, we brainstormed more ideas. Ewa found something called head mouse online and we thought its functions match perfectly with what we need. As a mouse alternative, head mouse can potentially allow the subject to do anything on a laptop, especially with his functioning shoulders as two clicking buttons. So we decided to offer two solutions to the case study, a low-tech one and a high-tech one, just in case the subject has a preference based on his personal background. We got a lot of help from Luis and Jiwon in that workshop class and we were really grateful. Luis was really good at pushing us to think about questions like how the subject’s financial and educational condition will affect our solutions. With his instructions we thought further and took a lot of factors into consideration. Jiwon on the other hand gave good feedback and suggestions on how we could design the high-tech head mouse. Instead of using some motion sensors on the shoulders, she suggested some rods hanging down which could be touched by the shoulder. And that is actually what we did in our prototype.

After that class we though it would be important that we obtain more information about the subject himself since it will determine our final design of the solutions. So we emailed Marianne and got told that the man is well educated and in a rather good financial situation. We were happy to learn that the patient would be able to use a laptop so that the head mouse solution could be further developed. But we also decided to keep the low tech solution just in case the subject prefer it to the other.

     Stage 2: Researching

After the brainstorm stage we moved onto the research stage. We wanted to figure out is available on the market first and how they can incorporate with our idea. So we found some free software online that can use the computer camera to capture the movement of the head to replace the mouse curser. We mainly tested out “Camera Mouse” (windows) and “iTracker” (Mac) and found that the biggest problem of these softwares is that the dwelling function is not that easy to use. That is, when you try to click on something, the software asks you to fix you movement and after a few second it will click automatically for you. The difficulty here is that first it’s really difficult for one to stay still for that long, and when it comes to some really small buttons it’s really difficult to click on. Other than that we thought the tracking was actually pretty good. So we tried to find something that could replace the clicking but didn’t find anything super satisfactory. So we decided to to prototype something that can make the clicking easier.

In terms of the low tech solution we though it was easy to prototype on our own and the biggest issues will be how tiring it would be, is the laser easy to track and easy to be seen, etc.

 Stage 3: Prototyping

1. Low-tech :  The low-tech solution is easy to prototype. We used hard paper to make a ring on the head and placed the mini laser pen on the ring. We tested it with three different boards (with loose pictures, medium arrangement pictures, and tight arrangement pictures) and it all worked well. Please see video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAw3WQykXmA

2. High-tech: The idea of prototyping something high-tech first intimidated us, but encouraged by Marianne and with the assistance from Luis, we successfully made it possible with Makey-Makey. What we wanted eventually is to make the two shoulders the left and right click of the mouse, and by lifting them the mouse can work properly with the head tracking software. We made two wings attached to a cupboard head crown and put conductive tape on each of them. And then we made to should pad with conductive tape on them as well. When the pad and the wind touched the “mouse” is supposed to click. Then we found that the should pad was not necessary as it fell so easily and sometimes made it hard to feel that the shoulder touched the wing. So eventually we just put layers of conductive tape on the shoulder. As we tested the prototype with the software “iTrack” (the subject has a mac computer), the device would allow the subject to type, watch videos online and more. The user experience wasn’t too bad either, it was not tiring to use it for 10-15 minutes and it was very easy to learn how to use it. Please see video of watching a youtube video with the prototype here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Av8SUKLSWq0

II. Challenges

Our project went mostly smooth actually, but some of the challenges we had in the process would be the part of making the prototype. Ewa and I don’t feel super comfortable with playing with arduino and stuff so we were sort of reluctant to prototype the high-tech solution (while it actually turned out pretty low-tech in the end). But we know it is very important to test and experience out design before we suggest it to the subject, we still did it in the end. Surprisingly it wasn’t difficult at all to use Makey Makey and construct the prototype, and I think we both enjoyed the process very much. Our prototype looked like a toilet with two feet, which we laughed at each other for a long time. I am really glad that we managed to make it happen. And I think what I learned from it is that sometimes it’s really important to get out your comfort zone and have a try. If we only stay at the theoretical level we will never know if our proposal will be feasible and good for the subject

III. Future Improvements

Now the prototypes are really simple. In the future after talking to the subject we wanna see which he would like to try first and make some improvements. For the laser pointing device we would like to explore if the laser could be put in to the glasses or a hat. And for the head mouse, of course we want to make the device more comfortable to wear, that might include replacing cupboard with some other materials like plastic and foam. Besides we would love to make the device more smooth to use. Also we might consider combine the two solutions if the subject is willing to use both of them. And aesthetically, we definitely want to make the devices more beautiful to wear. Hopefully we can get some feedback from the subject himself as well.

 

Week 6: Feedback for “Theft And Artistry”(Vasudevan)

  • About the song “hymn for the weekend”itself:

I like this song made by Coldplay and Beyonce. The mixed effect of sporty melody and the India style really leaves me a deep impression. I am a receptive person,  I am really excited to see different culture come together. When I listen to it, I focus on the background music mostly, and  I heard a sound like bell which makes me awake immediately. Because when I close my eyes and enjoy the melody , I can feel the India style. Like India beauty wearing sari walks along the streets, and the Taj Mahal is just appears infant of my eyes. I think this is what REMIX gives me. Not only about the British lyrics and music designing, but also about the India culture. And because of this song, I know what is Holi festival. Because the background of the MV is India Holy festival.

About the culture appropriation:

Since “hymn for the weekend”has gained great success after its publish, heated discussion about this music also comes. I searched some information about how Indians think about “hymn for the weekend” . Some of them feel it’s offensive and aggressive.  Because there are some offensive elements in the MV. For example, there is a picture about India slum. In front of the slum,  Indian kids are having fun with the lead singer of Coldplay.

Here is the shot:

Indians hope others also concern about their development instead focus on religions(because their are many shots about religion in the MV). But I think “hymn for the weekend”is just a music that use necessary parts to create fantastic music. There is nothing about underestimating, nothing about ignorance of country development.  The REMIX of culture and music can bring listeners wonderful music enjoyment.

Some inspiration about how to REMIX a music without “offensive”:

Before adding new elements to a music, I think the production team should do a survey about them firstly. In terms of “Hymn for the weekend”, different opinions come from different countries. That’s to say, because of people’s statement, singers don’t think too much about slum for instance. They just want to create a mysterious atmosphere, but some Indians regard something happened in the MV as an theft and a offensive thing.  In order to avoid the conflict, they both side should have a communication and understand each other.

Hence, as for REMIX a music, no matter  monetarily or artistically, respect each other firstly, and then create a fancy and give it a shot.

By the way, I really like this sentence:”Your training as an artist is essentially about impersonation, imitation,You learn to get better by kind of borrowing or adapting or training yourself in the way of the people who came before you.” This is what we called *REMIX*.

Lab6:Serial Communication(by Lily Wang)

Date:Oct.20

Instructor:Moon

Materials needed:

  • Arduino kit
  • Laptop

Goal:

Combine Arduino with processing, using one as input, another as output to create animation or circuits.

Introduction:

I chose”Arduino to Processing” and used the light sensor. I created an animation in Processing which can change due to light changes. When it’s natural light, it is daytime in Processing, when the artificial light(torchlight on my cell phone) is on, it turns to night and there will be a star rotating.

So at first I copied the connection code on the website to Arduino and Processing. But when I chose the right port in Processing and upload it, I couldn’t upload the Arduino code. After asking professor for help, I knew that I couldn’t upload them at the same time.

Question solved, and my light sensor was working well.

And then I started to create the animation. At first I used the wrong rotate function because I put it in a wrong order with the star. But then they were all solved.

 

And my Arduino code:

// IMA NYU Shanghai
// Interaction Lab
// Updated Oct 18, 2017

setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
}

 

void loop() {
int sensorValue = analogRead(A0)/4;
Serial.write(sensorValue);

// too fast communication might cause some latency in Processing
// this delay resolves the issue.
delay(10);
}

 

 

 

 

What I learned:

Some basics to connect Arduino with Processing and how to send data between them. I want to do more complicated serial communication in the future.

 

 

 

// IMA NYU Shanghai
// Interaction Lab


import processing.serial.*;


Serial myPort;
int valueFromArduino;


void setup() {
  size(500, 500);
  background(0);
  noStroke();

  printArray(Serial.list());
  // this prints out the list of all available serial ports on your computer.
  
  myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[3], 9600);
  // WARNING!
  // You will definitely get an error here.
  // Change the PORT_INDEX to 0 and try running it again.
  // And then, check the list of the ports,
  // find the port "/dev/cu.usbmodem----" or "/dev/tty.usbmodem----" 
  // and replace PORT_INDEX above with the index number of the port.
}


void draw() {
  // to read the value from the Arduino
  while ( myPort.available() > 0) {
    valueFromArduino = myPort.read();
  }
   println(valueFromArduino);
   
  if(valueFromArduino<30){
    background(0);
      fill(255) ;
  pushMatrix();
  translate(450,450);
    rotate(radians(frameCount));
  beginShape();
  vertex(268,93);
  vertex(153,419);
  vertex(440,235);
  vertex(87 , 236);
  vertex(388, 434);
  endShape();
    popMatrix();
    

  
  
  
  }else{background(#96E5F7);
  }
  
  // add your code here
}


Week 6 Recitation (Marcela Godoy)

By. Sabina Olsson
October 20th, 2017

For this week’s recitation we were supposed to work with serial communication with Arduino and Processing, sending data between the two programs. The two tasks were:

  1. Create a Processing sketch that sends data to Arduino. Receive that data and express it using physical components (ie. servo, led, buzzer).
  2. Create a circuit using your Arduino to send data from physical inputs (ie. variable resistors, buttons, tilt switch) to Processing. Receive the data and express it visually in your Processing sketch.

I started with what I found the easiest; to send data from Arduino to show something in Processing. Since we did an example in class, where the size of an ellipse in Processing changed when a potentiometer was turned on the breadboard using Arduino, I felt like that was a good example to work with, and just change some parameters. I decided to firstly replace the ellipse with a rectangle, since I felt like I’ve worked a lot with ellipses lately, and just really wanted some change.

At first I thought that I’d use a pressing switch, as when the button is pressed, the size of the ellipse would change randomly. I built the circuit with the button, that was fine, but I could not for the sake of anything get the code to work. This stressed me out a lot, since this was just the beginning of the assignment, and I didn’t want to spend too much time on just this part. So I decided that this might be a little too advanced for me, so I went back to the potentiometer idea. Thus, I connected the circuit with the potentiometer (I only got a bit confused how to connect it to the Analog inputs, but I checked the instructions from a previous recitation (week 2) and figured it out quickly). Then I wrote the code. I used the same code for Arduino as found in the example we did in class, and the same code for Processing as well. However, I changed the Processing code so that instead of the size changing on the rectangle, it would be the color. So I added the function “fill()” and made that changeable, keeping the rectangle size stable instead.

This worked well, and I was pleased to see that it looked as I expected it to be. I kept the color in a grey scale, and I do realize that I could’ve made it more interesting, and added RGB values instead, to make it change in a wide range of colors. However, I didn’t think about that until later, when I finished the coding and had already moved on. Anyways, the code worked fine, and I managed to get the physical input from the Arduino to change something seen on my computer in Processing.


This is the basic code I used to build the basic rectangle.


Here are the photos of the actual code I used, and how the rectangle looked like.

The code I used for Processing was:

import processing.serial.*;

Serial myPort;
int valueFromArduino;

void setup() {
size(500, 800);
background(0);

printArray(Serial.list());
// this prints out the list of all available serial ports on your computer.

myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[ 2 ], 9600);
// WARNING!
// You will definitely get an error here.
// Change the PORT_INDEX to 0 and try running it again.
// And then, check the list of the ports,
// find the port “/dev/cu.usbmodem—-” or “/dev/tty.usbmodem—-”
// and replace PORT_INDEX above with the index number of the port.
}

void draw() {
while (myPort.available() >0){
valueFromArduino = myPort.read();
}
println(valueFromArduino);

background(0);
int size = valueFromArduino;
fill(size);
rect(width/2, height/2, 200, 100);
}

And for Arduino it was:

// IMA NYU Shanghai
// Interaction Lab

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
}

void loop() {
int sensorValue = analogRead(A0);

//int valMapped = int(map(sensorValue,0,1023,0,255));
Serial.write(sensorValue);
// too fast communication might cause some latency in Processing
// this delay resolves the issue.
delay(100);
}

Then, moving on to using Processing to create something happening in Arduino, I decided to do something a little more complicated. I heard from another InterLab student that they were going to do something with traffic lights and LEDs lighting up based on where the mouse was on the screen, and I really liked that idea, so I decided to try and do something like that too, on my own. However, I did have a whole lot of struggles with it, trying to figure out how to write the code.

Building the circuit was not a problem, since we had built the traffic light circuit in Arduino previously (recitation week 2, yay!), so I found that part easy to do. However, when I opened Processing I faced some trouble. Creating the rectangular window and coloring it in 3 different colors was fine, that’s something we did last week. But then I had to use Boolean statements to track the mouse, which meant that I had to do some research on how to use that, since I had no clue what to do. So after reading up on a bunch of functions on the Processing website (specifically the mouseY and mouseX functions), I started to experiment a little, and after a few tries I got it to work. Then I opened Arduino, and had to play around with that as well to get it to work. I had to use boolean statements again, but since we had worked with pinMode and OUTPUT before, I found that a bit easier to figure out, since I just had to add the valueFromProcessing.

The first time I ran the code with connection to the circuit, I couldn’t understand why only the green light lit up and not the others. The code was right (didn’t get any error messages) and I was confused/frustrated for like 10 (very long) minutes. Then looking closer at my circuit, I realized that I’d forgotten that the LED pins have positive and negative “legs” (anode/cathode?) and that I had put the yellow and red ones in the wrong direction…. Luckily this was quickly fixed, as I flipped the LEDs around, and then it worked fine.


This is when only the green LED light worked.


Here is when they all were connected properly.


Here is how the code looked like, and how the colors looked like on the screen.

The Processing code I used:

import processing.serial.*;

Serial myPort;
int valueFromArduino;

void setup() {
size(500, 700);
background(0);

printArray(Serial.list());
// this prints out the list of all available serial ports on your computer.

myPort = new Serial(this, Serial.list()[2], 9600);
// WARNING!
// You will definitely get an error here.
// Change the PORT_INDEX to 0 and try running it again.
// And then, check the list of the ports,
// find the port “/dev/cu.usbmodem—-” or “/dev/tty.usbmodem—-”
// and replace PORT_INDEX above with the index number of the port.
}

void draw() {
// to read the value from the Arduino
while ( myPort.available() > 0) {
valueFromArduino = myPort.read();
}

rectMode(CENTER);

fill(0, 255, 0);
rect(width/2, 100, 500, 200);
fill(255, 255, 0);
rect(width/2, 300, 500, 200);
fill(255, 0, 0);
rect(width/2, 500, 500, 200);

if (mouseY<200) {
myPort.write(‘G’);
} else if (mouseY<400) {
myPort.write(‘Y’);
} else if(mouseY<600){
myPort.write(‘R’);
}
else{
myPort.write(‘N’);}
}

The Arduino code I used:

int valueFromProcessing;
int ledPin = 13;

void setup() {
Serial.begin(9600);
pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
// to receive a value from Processing
while (Serial.available()) {
valueFromProcessing = Serial.read();
}

if (valueFromProcessing == ‘R’) {
digitalWrite(8, HIGH);
digitalWrite(12, LOW);
digitalWrite(13, LOW);
} else if (valueFromProcessing == ‘Y’) {
digitalWrite(12, HIGH);
digitalWrite(8, LOW);
digitalWrite(13, LOW);
} else if (valueFromProcessing == ‘G’) {
digitalWrite(13, HIGH);
digitalWrite(8, LOW);
digitalWrite(12, LOW);
} else{
digitalWrite(8, LOW);
digitalWrite(12, LOW);
digitalWrite(13, LOW);
}

// too fast communication might cause some latency in Processing
// this delay resolves the issue.
delay(10);
}

Overall I’m very happy that I got this to work as well. It was very tricky to figure out, and it took a lot of time, but I’m impressed and satisfied that I got it to work in the end. The coding was difficult to me, and it did take some time to figure out, but I’m glad that I’m starting to understand the code better and how to build it in the right way. For the potentiometer and Arduino to Processing task, I could’ve done something more advanced, but I felt like I wanted to stick to working on something I’d seen during class, since that felt safe, and then try to put more effort into the other task with the LEDs. I still feel like the assignment went well, and I did learn a lot more about coding.

In the end, even though I still find a lot of the work complicated and a bit difficult, I think I’m improving in working with Processing and Arduino. I definitely feel like I’m getting more comfortable working with the programs and code, so I think that’s one of the more important outcomes of the assignment, besides making something function and merely finishing the task.

Maker Fair – Adonis Langumas

The maker fair was an interesting event. There were multiple different types of stalls.

The first type of stall were merchants selling their parts. This exposed me to how varied the amount of things I can use with Arduino. The amount of different switches, lights, sensors, boards, and prebuilt casings was surprising and exciting.

In addition to these, were many people who made interesting projects. Such as these:

While it was a cool event, I was a little sad that it was not as interactive. That is why I enjoyed the balloon project. They allowed us the ability to drive it around. I learned how expansive the amount of things I can use and do with arduino is.

[Moon] Lab 6: Serial Communication (Alexandru)

Title: Serial Communication

Date: October 20, 2017

Instructor: Jung Hyun Moon

Aim/Goal: Send data between Arduino and Processing using serial communication.

Project

  • Light bulb and light switch

 

 

Conclusion, Results, Difficulties and Achievements

For today’s lab, I worked on two simple interactions with a similar theme, but independent from each other. I first used a light sensor attached to the Arduino, and sent those values to Processing though serial communication. Then, in Processing, I controlled the opacity of a yellow ellipse based on the values received, thus giving the impression of a light bulb (or a sun) that lights up according to the intensity of the light hitting the sensor.

Secondly, I attached a green LED to the Arduino, which I wanted to control through Processing. Initially, I used the mouse coordinates, which worked pretty well, but then I decided to implement a more visual type of switch, so I created a slider. I did not use any libraries for it, but rather I made it using simple rectangles, and then mapped the position of the draggable knob to the intensity of the LED.

Serial communication provides us with a great way to merge the different skills we have acquired so far.

 

Handloom – Cheryl

I went through a really rough patch with this project for some reason. It was difficult to put it together and the end product wasn’t really easy to work with either. I guess to look at the bright side, there’s a lot of lessons I can learn from this project.

It was hard for me at first to understand how a loom actually works so I was looking at other people’s documentations and doing research online to figure out a basis for this kind of design and work on top of that. A few things that I had in mind when I was designing my loom on illustrator:

  1. Make the teeth where one hangs the yarn flat instead of having it standing on the edge. I thought that this way, it’s impossible for the yarn to slip up and down or even out.
  2. Make the heddle part as easy to control as possible. I was thinking about a more complicated mechanism for a long while but decided it would be too hard for me to accomplish. So I just made a handle on top of the heddle so one can easily control the heddle with one hand.
  3. Make the shuttle more practical with two functions: storing excessive yarns and also one can easily flip through after each time the weft goes through.
  4. Raster something that actually matters. I always forget the different weaving patterns so I thought it would be helpful to raster the patterns on the loom so one can check at anytime.

With these ideas in mind, I made the following design in illustrator:

The laser cutting part didn’t really go well for me. I was trying to use thicker cardboard first to make it stronger. However, the cardboard was too thick to cut through operating the standard power. At the end of the session, it was hard to take the parts out even using box cutter.

It worked the third session when I tried a thinner board.

Multiple problems came up when I finally get to assemble the loom together. And turn out that some of the design ideas I put in originally to solve the problems I predicted turned out to cause more problems :(((

  1. The two board at the back and in the front wasn’t enough to provide sufficient support for the weaving board. It actually works better with only the board at the back. But still it’s pretty unstable, especially when using the heddle. I glued the boards to another cardboard, which works a little better, but still I should have think of it when I was designing. Especially, if I have done a prototype after the illustrator design, I would have seen the problem too. Guess sometimes it’s really not enough to just think with your mind.
  2. This might be even worse than the last point. the weaving board which is too long for its width. Also with this flat design instead of what many traditional design go for(and I thought it would be better), the weaving board needs to take much more weight. Considering these two points, and with the material adding onto it, the board bended while I was weaving.
  3. This is comparably a minor point but I could have shorten the heddle a little. It works ok now. But when it’s going down, I think I could’ve made it shorter so that the distance between the warps would be greater, thus easier to weave.
  4. The shuttle could have been improved too. The main purpose of it is to go through the warps. And based on that, I think the most efficient design would have been having only one part pointing out instead of two like what I have right now, which can stuck to things more easily, especially for people like me who are less handy.

I think if I were to conclude one most important lesson from this project, is that one should always do a prototype, especially when the topic is something really unfamiliar. The prototype does not necessarily need to work fine, but the process of putting something on mind/paper into actual work itself can help smooth the process and identify potential problems.

Week5: Response to the ‘Ecstasy of Influence’ (Krom)

This was a rather long and thought-provoking passage that I am not sure about but will try to analyze it as best as possible.

What is plagiarism? by definition, “Plagiarism is the ‘wrongful appropriation’ and ‘stealing and publication’ of another author’s ‘language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions’ and the representation of them as one’s own original work.”(Wikipedia).

This article reminded me of something that I knew about, but was unfamiliar with its term, ‘Cryptomnesia’. Many times you may be watching something or reading a book, and some elements of them strike out as you may have witnessed them somewhere else. Has the author or director consciously copied this content from someone else or did he genuinely feel this idea was of his own(self-made)?

Jonathan Lethem ventured upon the copyright laws and how they came into existence as a way of promoting originality and encouraging new ideas but have eventually lead to the discouragement of new ideas. A girls scout has to pay royalties to a band for singing their song during their group meetings, is this why copyright laws were implemented?

The author of this text was very critical of Disney, who established themselves by extracting ideas from different cultures and using it for their ‘now renowned’ movies(Sleeping Beauty, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs etc.) yet at the same time, would sue individuals who tried to use their images(such as Mickey Mouse) for their own personal projects. This bias has been tolerated as it has mainly been large organizations going up against individuals who did not stand a chance when it came to legal affairs. This made me think about Kirby Ferguson’s “Everything is a remix”, where he spoke about Steve Jobs openly confessing to stealing ideas from their company but later on, when the same thing was done with them(Samsung vs Apple), Steve Jobs had the audacity to call the rest as “Thieves”. There is a certain irony to both Disney and Apple’s situations.

Overall I agree with the concept of plagiarism and the protection of one’s personal rights over his/her ideas, however, in today’s world, the rise of digital technology makes it harder for us to distinguish whether something is plagiarised content or not.

Week 5: Questions on the readings (Godoy)

By Sabina Olsson

  • If you could connect what you can make with Arduino and processing, What would you make?
    That’s a very broad question, and I don’t really have a specific answer to it at this point, but I would probably want to build something physical that interacts with human movements, but translates it into something on a computer screen, as in like the Arduino collects the information in the physical world, and sends it to the computer, while Processing takes the information and draws something on the screen relating to the information received. So, for instance, a cool, and simple thing to make would be a machine with a sensor that recognizes your heartbeat, and displays an image or a drawing on the computer screen depending on how high or low your heart rate is, to get you to calm down or wake up. Like if your heart rate was really high, then an image with a calm context or message would appear on the screen. The information put in (heartbeat) would translate into a receiving a visual or written message on the screen.
  • Find two interactive projects that you think are interesting. Why do you like them?
    One project that I really found interesting was the wooden mirror project we saw in class one lecture, that was built by some students of NYU’s ITP program. The mirror is build of many wooden pixels, that rotate or change position depending on movements or objects in front of it. I really like this idea because it’s just really fascinating, the technology works so smoothly too, and it doesn’t look complicated. From an aesthetic point of view as well, the mirror looks really nice with its wooden surface, and simple details, making it almost look like a magical object when it is running.
    The other project that comes to my mind is another one we saw in class, that I also haven’t been able to stop thinking of; the mechanical shoes that you can elevate and lower with an app (short++). Also created by a student from the ITP program, the shoes can lift you up or lower you down depending on what you want. I personally like the idea, mainly because of the interesting reception and social context of the usage of the shoes. The importance of height in society and different social situations is really interesting, and it was both funny and fascinating watching the video of her wearing the shoes outside, to see how people reacted to them.
  • Find two interactive projects that you think are interesting. How do they work? Try to find out What hardware/software is being used.
    I had a hard time trying to find the exact hardware and software used for each project, but I’ll do my best to estimate what technology was used to create them. For the wooden mirror project I saw in a youtube video explaining the project, that behind the wooden blocks there is a small camera that acts as a sensor based on the light that comes through to it, and (what I assume), sends the information to the section controlling the blocks to move to represent the silhouette of the person or object standing in front of it. I would think that it’s built mainly Arduino technology, since there are sensors and cameras involved, that receive input, and produces a physical change as output, in this case in the little wooden pieces.
    For the mechanic shoes, I know they are controlled via an iPhone app, so I think that there might be some Processing involved here, to build a code at least. However, for the mechanical part, actually Arduino might have been involved too, in producing a physical output too. So for that project I find it hard to decide on what the hardware/software is.
  • Look around for a problem you would like to solve or something you would like to improve. Why do you think this is an important  matter to solve or improve? For which people are you making life easier? How could you solve this problem with design using Arduino and/or processing?
    So personally, I thought for a bit, but couldn’t think of any deep, serious problems that I want to solve (maybe that’s fortunate, since it means I don’t really have any huge troubles..), but one small thing that’d be cool to figure out would be a door sensor with a camera, so it’s possible to see who’s at the door from inside the room, and also being able to unlock it from the inside without having to go over to the door and open it, after seeing who it is. So it’s pretty unnecessary idea, but I just came to think of it, since I live in a small dorm room, and I have the upper bed of the bunkbed, which means that every time there is a knock on the door, I have to climb down from the bed, to go over and see who it is, and open. And then climb back up into my bed. I know that this is a small problem to solve, but hey, it might make someone’s life easier! So, the idea would be to have a distance or motion sensor on the outside of the door, next to a camera, so when someone is standing in front of the door, the camera turns on and takes a photo of who it is and sends it to my phone or laptop (and my roommates phone/laptop). Then after seeing who it is, I’d be able to press some button on my phone, that will react, send the info to the door lock (where another type of component (not sure yet what kind though) sits) and responds with unlocking the door. Besides helping me, I think it’d be a useful idea for people who are disabled, or just have a difficulty to move easily and quickly, to help them being able to answer the door without problems. I also think that seeing who it is on your phone might be a good thing, so even if you’re not in the room, you could still get a message if someone is knocking on your door, so you can see who’s tried to visit you. I don’t know the specifics of the code I’d use to build this, since it is pretty advanced to connect your phone and the camera and the Arduino together, and we haven’t learnt that, so I can’t really go into to deeply in the description. But I know I’d use a sensor, and that that would play a big role in the technic part. And besides, this is just a random idea so far, but I’ll keep it in a note for the future me to possibly work on it!

On the Rights of Molotov Man – Blog Post – Jay

The Molotov Man was an iconic photograph which the author featured on his website. Later on, people made small edits on Molotov Man. However, it was still obvious that the original art piece was still clearly present. I thought that there is no such there as originality. I believe that small edits towards the grand picture does make it original – its original because it’s different. Any difference, no matter how small, makes the new original. For example, if there were 3 identical diamonds which were 50 million each, and one had a little indent in it, that diamond is worth only 10 million. Its price has dropped so much because it’s different, even by the slightest margins. The author says Arauz was ” being converted into the emblem of an abstract riot-that it would be a betrayal of him if I did not at least protest the diminishment of his act of defiance.” I think should be expected from all artists once their works go public – it is something Arauz should have already known before exposing his photograph to the world.