Recitation 3: Sensors (Rudi)

In today’s recitation, we are supposed to pick a sensor, then build a circuit that integrates this sensor with our Arduino. We chose 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer and used the ADXL3xx example.

Components: 

1.Breadboard;

2.3-Axis Analog Accelerometer;

3.LED;

4.220 ohm Resistor;  

5.Jumper Cables (Hook-up Wires)

 

 

Process: 

We first connected the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer with the circuit according to the schematic. The 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer works as soon as we uploaded the example code. As we changed the position of the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer at different speeds, the serial monitor changed as well. So that means our 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer can work alone.

Later, we intended to use the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer to control the brightness of the LED. In other words, we expected that the brightness of the LED change while we are putting the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer in different spot at different speed. Therefore, we put one 220 ohm Resistor and an orange LED on the breadboard, then connected them to the Arduino UNO. But we got trouble about how to map an analog input. Professor Rudi came to help. He suggested us to search for more instructions on Arduino’s website and explained that there should only be one setup and one loop in the code. So we adjust the code and tried, the circuit works beyond imagination. When we switch 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer, the brightness of the LED exactly changed. However, the brightness only ranged in a very limited scope. That’s to say, the change of the brightness is not quite obvious. Professor Rudi advised us to check the code again. This time, we found that the serial monitor actually ranging from 200 to 400, not that huge as the code default designed. Consequently, we changed the original code 0-1023 to 200-400. After the adjustment, the LED’s brightness varied quite obvious.

 

 

 

Question 1:

What did you intend to assemble in the recitation exercise? If your sensor/actuator combination were to be used for pragmatic purposes, who would use it, why would they use it, and how could it be used?

I intended to assemble LED and 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer.

I think our sensor can be used to adjust the light stage effect in a concert. DJs, directors, and singers can use it. Simply by turning the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer up and down, they could use it to create a special atmosphere which supports the stage, so that audiences can enjoy the performance in a visual aspect. 

   

Question 2:

Can you identify your circuit with any device you interact with in your daily life? How might your circuit be used to have a meaningful interaction?

I believe that my circuit can identify with a speed tester in my daily life. Their working methods are really similar.

I think my circuit can be fit in various meaningful fields, such as it can be used in a music concert as I have discussed above. Furthermore, it can also be used to design games. Take the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer as a control center, the brightness of the light may change based on the speed and position of the 3-Axis Analog Accelerometer which a player uses it.

 

Question 3:

How is code similar to following a recipe or tutorial?

Code is similar to following a recipe or tutorial in a certain degree. Both of them are generally following instructions given by somebody else. However, differences also exist. For instance, while following a recipe or tutorial, people do not need to understand every single word. To get the main idea is the purpose. But computer have to follow the code strictly. It continues only if every code is right. Otherwise, the task can not be done.

Question 4:

In Language of New Media, Manovich describes the influence of computers on new media. In what ways do you believe the computer influences our human behaviors?

From where I stand, computers can influence our life in various ways. To start with, computers have already changed our ways of communicating, obtaining information and transacting. The development of technology has changed the world to a more fast and convenient place. So that human behaviors become more simplified and easier. However, one disadvantageous impact is that people gradually become lazy. They are longing for a method which the computers can do anything they want for them. In conclusion, influences can be varied and beyond imagination. We need to find a way to balance the current situation and the development.

/*
  ADXL3xx

  Reads an Analog Devices ADXL3xx accelerometer and communicates the
  acceleration to the computer. The pins used are designed to be easily
  compatible with the breakout boards from SparkFun, available from:
  http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/categories.php?c=80

  The circuit:
  - analog 0: accelerometer self test
  - analog 1: z-axis
  - analog 2: y-axis
  - analog 3: x-axis
  - analog 4: ground
  - analog 5: vcc

  created 2 Jul 2008
  by David A. Mellis
  modified 30 Aug 2011
  by Tom Igoe

  This example code is in the public domain.

  http://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/ADXL3xx
*/

// these constants describe the pins. They won't change:
const int groundpin = 18;             // analog input pin 4 -- ground
const int powerpin = 19;              // analog input pin 5 -- voltage
const int xpin = A3;                  // x-axis of the accelerometer
const int ypin = A2;                  // y-axis
const int zpin = A1;                  // z-axis (only on 3-axis models)
float val = 0;
void setup() {
  // initialize the serial communications:
  Serial.begin(9600);

  // Provide ground and power by using the analog inputs as normal digital pins.
  // This makes it possible to directly connect the breakout board to the
  // Arduino. If you use the normal 5V and GND pins on the Arduino,
  // you can remove these lines.
  pinMode(groundpin, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(powerpin, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(groundpin, LOW);
  digitalWrite(powerpin, HIGH);
 pinMode(9, OUTPUT);
  
}

void loop() {
  // print the sensor values:
  Serial.print(analogRead(xpin));
  // print a tab between values:
  Serial.print("t");
  Serial.print(analogRead(ypin));
  // print a tab between values:
  Serial.print("t");
  Serial.print(analogRead(zpin));
  Serial.println();
  // delay before next reading:
  delay(100);
  val = map(analogRead(0), 200, 400, 0, 256);
  analogWrite(9, val);
}

Week 3: Sensors (Jiaqi Hu)

Professor: Eric&Young

Partner: Frank Wang

 

Components:

  • Joystick Module
  • Breadboard
  • Arduino uno
  • LEDs ( red, yellow, green)
  • 220 ohm resistors
  • wires

Diagram:

Video:

Problems:

  1. Forget to connect resistors with LEDs.
  2. Do not know how to write codes which enable different axises of joystick module control LEDs in one to one correspondence.
  3. LEDs can’t light when connected to joystick module because we mistake the output pins of LEDs for input pins and connect the wrong wires.

Solutions:

  1. Connect 220 ohm resistors in parallel with LEDs.
  2. Test the joystick module and measure each value of its axises. Follow examples to write basic codes(such as input pins, analogWrite and digitalWrite) and ask instructors for help to complete the map codes.
  3. Change the wires and connect each LEDs to corresponding axises of joystick module.

Results:

The red LED light when joystick is turned right and when it’s turn left slowly the LED fades. The yellow LED is the same when joystick is turned upwards or downwards. The green LED light when the button is pressed and turns off when button is pressed again.

Question 1:

What did you intend to assemble in the recitation exercise? If your sensor/actuator combination were to be used for pragmatic purposes, who would use it, why would they use it, and how could it be used?

We intended to use different axises of joystick module to control different LEDs.

Car warning lights. When people are parking cars, LEDs with different colors light to represent different directions in which cars move. The visualized signals can be more clear to convey messages for people when they are unable to keep watching the directions while parking.

Question 2:

Can you identify your circuit with any device you interact with in your daily life? How might your circuit be used to have a meaningful interaction?

The keypad (especially dial pad), which makes different sounds when you dial different numbers, could be a more complicated version of our circuit.  In my view they share a similar mechanism.

Our circuit might be further improved such as by using more complicated lights which can show the changes in colors and brightness better. Converting the sense of direction into visual scene, when we are changing the directions from right to left or up to down, we can closely observe the brightness of lights and shad of colors to have a better understanding without using a conventional way.

Question 3:

How is code similar to following a recipe or tutorial?

First, both code and recipe or tutorial have clear instructions and steps. We are required to follow them step by step but cannot skip some of them or change the sequences. Second, they all need to follow certain format rather than do whatever we want. Third, you can add, subtract or change some parts of the steps to express personal appetites or ideas. Last but not least, once one step of them is wrong, the whole system may not work normally and need you to fix the small errors.

Question 4:

In Language of New Media, Manovich describes the influence of computers on new media. In what ways do you believe the computer influences our human behaviors?

First of all, computer has greatly influenced the way we communicate with each other. Communications are not limited by time or space any more, and have developed more forms than we could imagine before. Second, computer changes the perspectives by which we view the world. Computer is like another eye of humans, with both new and dead angles. On the one hand human perceive the world more likely through a numerical lens, while on the other such lens blocks something important and we just leg behind even computer brings as much convenience as possible at present.

Sample code of joystick module:

// # 
// # Editor     : Lauren from DFRobot
// # Date       : 17.01.2012

// # Product name: Joystick Module
// # Product SKU : DFR0061
// # Version     : 1.0

// # Description:
// # Modify the Sample code for the Joystick Module 

// # Connection:
// #        X-Axis  -> Analog pin 0
// #        Y-Axis  -> Analog pin 1
// #        Z-Axis  -> Digital pin 3
// # 


int JoyStick_X = 0; //x
int JoyStick_Y = 1; //y
int JoyStick_Z = 3; //key

void setup() 
{
  pinMode(JoyStick_Z, INPUT); 
  Serial.begin(9600); // 9600 bps
}
void loop() 
{
  int x,y,z;
  x=analogRead(JoyStick_X);
  y=analogRead(JoyStick_Y);
  z=digitalRead(JoyStick_Z);
  Serial.print(x ,DEC);
  Serial.print(",");
  Serial.print(y ,DEC);
  Serial.print(",");
  Serial.println(z ,DEC);
  delay(100);
}

Week 2: Arduino Basics – Zeyu Lu (Marcela)

 

Zeyu Lu

Professor Godoy

Interaction Lab Recitation

14 September 2018

Arduino Basics

Week 2 Recitation

  • Circuit 1: Fade

Components:

  • LED

By generating various brightness level of light, the LED creates the fading effect.

  • Resistor 220Ω

By reducing the current flow, the resistor protects the LED from too much voltage.

  • Wires

By conducting electricity, wires connect components.

 

 

It is a simple series circuit. I just put the LED and the resistor in a chain.

 

Process:

  • Build the circuit according to the circuit diagram Success

 

  • Upload the code to the Arduino. Success

#The key to the fading effect is to create a loop.

 

  • Circuit 2: toneMelody

Components:

  • Speaker

By generating different pitch of the sound, the speaker creates the melody.

  • Resistor 220Ω

By reducing the current flow, the resistor protects the LED from too much voltage.

  • Wires

By conducting electricity, wires connect components.

 

IMG_44551

 

It is also a simple series circuit. I just put the speaker and the resistor in a chain.

 

Process:

  • Build the circuit according to the circuit diagram. Success

 

  • Upload the code to the Arduino. Success

#The key to the melody effect is to create a loop and make some change to the pitch.

 

  • Circuit 3: Zelda Simon Says

Components:

  • LED

By generating light, the LED shows the signal to the player.

  • Speaker

By generating different pitch of sound, the speaker tells the player whether he  or she succeeds.

  • Resistor 220Ω

By reducing the current flow, the resistor protects the LED from too much voltage.

  • Wires

By conducting electricity, wires connect components.

  • Switches

By pushing the button, one switch starts the game and others are used as player’s input.

 

 

It looks complicated, but I found some patterns. Firstly, the LED, two resistors, one switch are in one series circuit. And the other three follow the pattern. Then there’s one switch and a resistor connected directly to the power and the ground to control the other four. Finally, I connected the speaker in parallel.

 

Process:

  • Build the circuit according to the circuit diagram. Failure

#I just had four switches but I needed five.

  • Delete one switch in the code.        Failure

#I didn’t fully understand the code, so it was difficult for me to make any change.

  • Borrow one switch and upload the original code. Success

#It turned out that just borrowing one more switch was much easier than reprogramming.

 

  • Reflections

Although I was instructed to do the exercises in pairs, I was reluctant to work with others because I’d rather solve every problem by myself. When it came to Circuit 3, however, I run into the shortage of equipment. I had intended to solve it by modifying the given code, but I failed. At last, I had to ask others for help. Luckily, one friendly student lent me his LED, and I made it finally.

In this recitation, I learned cooperation is important and efficient, but I still prefer to work alone.

 

  • Questions

Question 1:

Reflect on different interactions with technologies that you have observed in your daily life. Pick a few of these and write down your own definition of interaction based on your observations.

Observations:

the checkout counters in the NYUSH cafeteria

I think they’re well-designed in that the user just needs to put the plate on the table and place the card, and then they will check out automatically, which makes the process efficient and accurate. If one forgets to place the card and leave, they will give out a warning. For the checkout counter, it perfectly handles the inputs which are the food plates, processes the data, and outputs the total price. But on the other side, the user’s input is limited to the plates. So it is fantastic for checkout, but I think it isn’t highly interactive.

vending machines

Vending machines are similar to the checkout counters in terms of checkout, but their input is simplified to the numbers the users enter. And it displays how the purchased items fall to the box, which is a kind of fun.

Apple Watch

Apple Watch has various sensors so that it can measure the distance the user walks, the stairs climbed, and so on. Among them, what impresses me most is the LED lights and light-sensitive photodiodes which can monitor the heart rate.

Definition:

I think interaction is an infinite loop consisted of input, process, and output between two subjects.

 

Question 2:

During the assembly of the circuits, we used many electronic components as inputs and outputs. Which of these components do you recognize in the circuit?

Inputs: switches

Outputs: the LED, the speaker

 

Question 3:

If you have 100000 LEDs of any brightness and color at your disposal, what would you make and where would you put it?

I would like to use the LEDs to hold an event to raise citizens’ awareness of how much light a city generates every night. This event can be held in any modern building located in the CBD area. All the lights should be turned off. And there are only LED strings on the wall to provide the minimum light for the participants to see their way. The LED lights will finally lead them to one ordinary-bright room. Then they may realize how bright it is. We can use the rest of the LEDs to hold similar events in other metropolitans where people take brightness for granted.

The event is intended to raise people’s appreciation on electricity and light where they have been overlooked and wasted casually.

 

Question 4:

Which reflections about the nature of interaction can you make about the Figure I.1 in the Physical Computing reading?

It vividly shows the limitation of the input of ordinary computers. People’s other sensors don’t exist from a computer’s perspective because they can’t be the input. According to O’Sullivan and Igoe, there is growing need for the “computers that respond to the rest of your body and the rest of your world” (Introduction). And I think the finger in Figure I.1 may only be a moving stick to computer despite how sensitive human finger actually is.

 

  • Citation

All diagrams except the last one are from:

http://ima.nyu.sh/interaction-lab/category/recitations/

The Zelda Simon Says circuit and code were from:

https://www.tinkercad.com/things/bMAvN7Djoja#/

Physical Computing – Introduction, O’Sullivan and Igoe

Physical Computing’s Greatest Hits (and misses) by Tom Igoe

 

Research on Kinematic sculptures (working with electrons)

The research on Kinematic sculptures for me is done in a time relevant base. I took a look on what’s the character of kinematic aesthetic representation in ancient time, then I tried to compare them with the comtemperory representation.

Among many kenematic representation, I chose one famous painting from Vincent van Gogh as the sign of Kinematic aesthetic in ancient time.

“动态艺术”的图片搜索结果

https://www.google.com.hk/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjAseDA_MvdAhWHuY8KHbWxAZUQjRx6BAgBEAU&url=https%3A%2F%2Ftwitter.com%2Fwanfuqin%2Fstatus%2F973593097534754817&psig=AOvVaw0F456aim2abacDSD3Iych4&ust=1537614490769722

I chose this picture for one main reason that it shows a very vivid kinematic figure even though it’s actually still. By looking at this picture, one may feel that the clouds, the sky and even the mountain is moving. Actually, this is one main characters for the ancient representation of kinematic figure, which using the static figure to describe the moving object. This is probably due to the technology limitation back then. Compared to the advanced technology and all sorts of energy source, painting may be one of the best ways to accomplish this goal in the ancient time.

For the comtemporary kinematic sculptures, I chose several representatives that I felt really interesting.

佳士得在伦敦推出动态艺术展

“Kinetic sculptures”的图片搜索结果

“Kinetic sculptures”的图片搜索结果

The first one here is done by playing with the shadow and the light source.

The second one is utilizing the power of wind and produce a moving object so that the viewer will observe multiple sides of the sculpture.

The third one is using hundreds of metal. The reflection and the special visual effect of the metal is the main reason why this figure is stunning.

All three kinematic sculptures are very astonishing but all of them are only can be done in the comtemporary society. This also suggests that the technology developement will somehow broaden the way of representation of aesthetic works.

Working with Electrons – Kinetic Art Comparison Coneys

The two kinetic sculptures I’m comparing is the Soto Sphere in Caracas by Jesus Rafael Soto and the sculptures of Anthony Howe. For both of theses sculptures movement is very important. In the Soto sphere the movement is a trick, The sphere is an exercise in what some call “Virtual Volumes” the sphere is actually composed of various hanging bars that appear to make a sphere. It is ethereal but also present, almost oxymoronic in a sense. The sphere isn’t even really there but as you circle it the sphere appears to rotate but it is nothing more than a trick of the light. The sculpture doesn’t move but it is your action that changes your perception of the art. It challenges our conceptions of not just space and volume but also our perception of reality in classic post-modernist style.

In the sculptures of Anthony Howe the movement is real and tangible, the parts spin and move in front of you. Not only is movement very important to the sculpture but so is light, the parts as the pass by you glimmer and scintillate. Howe’s sculpture is less philosophical than Soto’s but appears almost mathematics in nature as if inspired by something like the Fibonacci sequence, the result is something alien yet familiar. It’s like nothing you’ve ever seen yet it echoes the shapes and the beauty of nature. Often times his sculptures are reminiscent of the forms of objects like flowers or stars. His art is inexorably tied to the natural environment in which his art is commonly situated relying upon the wind for movement and the sun for the magical glimmer. It is intended as per his description to calm and remove the cares of the view and it defiantly accomplishes that.

Week 3 Documentation by Jannie Zhou(Leon)

Recitation 3: Sensors

Date:  09/21/2018

Documented by: Jannie Zhou

Instructor: Leon & Rudi

Partner: Antonia

Circuit 1:

We built a circuit with vibration sensor. Despite of the original circuit we put a LED into this.

 

 

Circuit 2:

We built a circuit with moisture sensor. At first we didn’t know how to do with the 4 wired hooked on the sensor. But then we found out that we only need to connect 3 of them to the Arduino board.

 

Question 1:

What did you intend to assemble in the recitation exercise? If your sensor/actuator combination were to be used for pragmatic purposes, who would use it, why would they use it, and how could it be used?

Take our second circuit as an example, we intend to use this sensor to detect the humidity. For pragmatic use, this circuit can be used by some cosmetic companies. If they claim that their products could moisturize the skin they can use this sensor to detect the moisture before and after using their products so that the customers would actually  believe them.

 

Question 2:

Can you identify your circuit with any device you interact with in your daily life? How might your circuit be used to have a meaningful interaction?

The thermometer. The thermometer can sense the temperature and the moisture of the air. And our moisture sensor could be used in some VR experience to interact with the user to provide a perfect experience.

 

Question 3:

How is code similar to following a recipe or tutorial?

Code is the recipe for the computer. The computer read the code and follow it. They cannot create anything else beside the code. All they can do is follow it.

 

Question 4:

In Language of New Media, Manovich describes the influence of computers on new media. In what ways do you believe the computer influences our human behaviors?

Computer changed the way we think and reshaped our views of the world. For example, before the age of computer, no one would actually believe that you can FaceTime with someone who is 10,000 miles away from you. And no one would think that you can know there’s an earthquake or terrorism attack 5 minutes after it happens. And as we become more and more dependent on computers, we become more and more forgetful and impatient. We need our computer to organize our work, to create our schedule,  to remind us to do this or that. And we don’t want to wait any longer because the computer could send your message out in 1 second, and they can do calculating in an unbelievable speed.

Working with Electrons | Week 2: Using Magnetic Fields Lab – Pellegrino (Cossovich)

Lab Report | Using Magnetic Fields

Objective:

Examine the relationship between an electrical current and a magnetic field. What effect does one have on the other? What is the connection between the two fields? Furthermore, the objective was to familiarize ourselves with special instruments such as the power regulator and multimeters.

Materials:

  • String
  • 2 Bar Magnets
  • Device to hang something from.
  • Regulated Power Source
  • Multimeter
  • Copper Wire
  • Circular Magnet
  • Two needles or other small metal balance.

Procedure:

Part I:

  1. Tie one end of the string around the center of a bar magnet. Ensure that the magnet falls roughly parallel to the floor.
  2. Tie the other end of the string to something in order to suspend it in the air. Allow the magnet to stop spinning.
  3. Slowly bring the other bar magnet within range of the hanging magnet. Observe the reaction.

Part II:

  1. Connect a regulated power supply to a length of protected copper wire.
  2. Bring the copper wire within range of the still hanging bar magnet.
  3. Adjust the voltage and observe what happens.

Part III:

  1. Add loops/coils to the copper wire and repeat Part II.
  2. Observe what happens as you adjust the voltage.

Part IV:

  1. Coil a thin copper wire roughly 30 times. Wrap the ends of the wire around the coil to secure it and stretch the end perpendicular to the coiled loops.
  2. Stick two needles roughly 3cm apart into a piece of wood.
  3. Attach one end of the power regulator to one needle and the other end of the power regulator to the other needle.
  4. Place the round magnet between the two needles.
  5. Place the coiled wire to balance suspended between the two needles.
  6. Turn on the power regulator and provide the circuit with voltage.
  7. Spin the coil and observe what happens.

Observation:

Part I:

The magnet suspended above the ground.

When the other bar magnet was introduced, the suspended magnet spun to meet it.

Part II:

The suspended magnet with the copper wire nearby.

As we adjusted the level of voltage the magnet responded by spinning. When we held the wire one vertically it was attracted to one side of the magnet and when we held the wire vertically the other way it was attracted to the other end of the magnet.

Part III:

When the copper wire was coiled, the reaction of the magnet spinning was more apparent (although it’s not very clear in this photo).

Part IV:

Homemade basic motor created using the online instructions.

The motor, after spinning it initial, continues to spin.

The coil, however, only spun in a specific direction.

Results / Conclusions:

Part I:

In this experiment, we noticed the magnets react to each other by spinning when each’s magnetic field was introduced to the other.

Part II:

Originally, I set this experiment up using a 10k resistor within the circuit thinking it would protect the wires from the high voltage. However, the wires are already protected so this was unnecessary. Furthermore, I used the helping hands to hold the wire which was also unnecessary as the wire did not get hot. When doing it this way, it took 3v to see the magnet react to the circuit. However, it seemed especially attracted to the north end. This was actually because the metal of the helping hands was interfering with the magnetic fields.

In the second trial, I used a long protected copper wire in the circuit. In this case, we only transmitted 1.51V. As the wire approached the magnet, the magnet began to spin. When the wire was held vertically with the current flowing upwards, one side of the magnet was attracted over the other. When the wire was held the opposite way with the current flowing downwards, the other side was attracted.

Part III:

When we added a few coils to the copper wire, the reaction of the magnet became more apparent and acute, but only slightly.

Part IV:

For this part, the motor was already created. At first, the coil didn’t move, but that’s because I forgot to add the magnet at the base. Then, after the coil was spun initially, it began spinning wildly as we fed it about 6-7V. Furthermore, the coil spun only in one direction. It would not spin in the other direction even when forced. Additionally, the coil heated up a little bit when we increased the voltage.

Conclusion:

Through this series of small experiments, we explored for ourselves the relation between an electric current and a magnetic field. An electric current has a magnetic attraction. It was also helpful to familiarize ourselves with the use of the regulated power supply and the multimeter as essential tools for working with and measuring voltage, current, and resistance.

Recitation2

Circuit 1: Fading

Components:

  • Arduino board–electronics platform
  • LED–to show the light
  • 220-ohm resistor– reduce current flow and divide voltages,
  • hook-up wires–to link
  • breadboard– construction base for prototyping of electronics

Process: The process of connecting the circuit is pretty easy

Diagram:

Video:

 

 

Circuit 2: Play a Melody

components:

  • Arduino or Genuine board–electronics platform
  • piezo buzzer or a speaker–to show the output
  • hook-up wires–to link

Process:

Diagram:

Video:

Ciruit3: (option2) Race the Led

Components:

  • 10k resistor
  • LED
  • Push button
  • potentiometer–a sliding contact that forms an adjustable voltage divider.
  • Capacitor–power conditioning
  • Audino–electronics platform
  • Piezo–sensor
  • Breadboard– construction base for prototyping of electronics

Process:

The diagram is with a very clear introduction. So we assigned the job and worked on our own part. After we finished constructing, we found out that we don’t know for sure if we are doing right or not. Because we just focused on copy the diagram without understanding it first. So we checked the description again to know what is this circuit for.

Diagram:

Video:

 

 

Question 1:

The interactions that I noticed in my daily life is the use of Siri to call and search on the internet, which is Apple’s virtual assistant, and also, the front gate of the building can detect out motions and react to that. So in my understanding, interaction means two parts response to each other’s motion.

Question 2:

In the first one, the led is the output, and the buzzer in the second circuit is also an output. In the third one, the input is the buttons because they allowed the user to follow the LEDs and with that play the game. The output is the LEDs.

Question 3:

I will make a big thumb up image and hang it on the wall.

Question 4:

Through this image we can infer that “interacting” with something requires one or more of the five senses.

Documentation for recitation 2

Arduino Basics

Documented by: Skarpalezou Anna 

Partner: Kaley Arnof

Necessary Material:

DFRduino (programmable circuit board, variant of Arduino system)

Breadboard (in order to connect the various components, especially helpful in big circuits like n. 3)

Piezo Buzzer (produces sound, signifying the successful completion of the circuit, audio component)

Push-Button Switch (when pushed allows energy to instantaneously flow into the circuit)

Resistor (to regulate the amount of voltage coming in the circuit, so that our LEDs were not burnt we used 220 Ohms and in other cases we had to use bigger ones like 10K Ohms)

LED (when circuit is successfully built it lights up, a small diode that emits light and is a visual component)

Wires (to easily connect components to one another, usually through the breadBoard)

Circuit 1: Fade

The goal of the first Circuit was to use an analogWrite() function to make an LED light fade. That is possible because, in contrast to digital code, analog allows for non-binary information to be send to the board and hence allow the light, not only to turn on and off, but also to have different levels of brightness.

The design of the circuit was relatively simple and straightforward

I connected pin number 9 to a 220Ohm resistor and that resistor to an LED light, finishing by connecting the LED light to ground. This is what it looked like:

Circuit 1 Fade

Circuit 2: toneMelody

The goal of doing this circuit was to understand the use of tone() to create melodies. The design of this one was also quite simplistic, as we only got to power the piezo buzzer and send in the code

Here’s what it looked and sounded like:

tone melody video

Circuit 3: Speed Game

Circuit 3 was by far the most challenging but fun to make and use out of the 3. My partner and I chose to make the speed game. The idea of the game was that once you heard the sound made by the buzzer, your time starts, and whoever pushes their button more times, within the allowed time frame wins, signified by their LED light turning on. It was surprisingly fun to create and made me think a lot about single button interaction. I think that even though trying to create interfaces maybe even without buttons so that interaction between humans and computers is a smoothly and easily done, is definitely what we are currently working towards, there is a uniqueness in being able to limit one’s interaction surfaces to a single button and still be able to create an engaging game.

Going back to the actual circuit, this is a representative drawing.  Because of the complexity of the connections, I resorted to drawing a breadboard, so that the result is clearer.

here is what it actually looked like:

Circuit 3 Speed Game: video

Question 1:

Reflect on different interactions with technologies that you have observed in your daily life. Pick a few of these and write down your own definition of interaction based on your observations.

 

Interaction for me is a form of two-way communication, an exchange of messages between two actors, inanimate or not. This can happen through sound, movement or any other action that can be understood and processed as a signal of something. Human Interaction with Technology is similarly the communication and exchange of messages that happens between a human and a computer, through listening, speaking and thinking. Interactions with technologies and computers are now more than ever an innate part of everyday life on earth. From the motion sensor that turn on the light at your garage, to the welcoming tune playing when you enter Family Mart and from Kinect using your body motions to enter you into a gaming world, to Siri and Alexa taking over our oral communication. Especially the last two, as more sophisticated, were once thought impossible. I find it incredible how with relatively low cost, we are today able to purchase products that can have functions once thought to be what distinguishes human from animals. And even though the very process may yet not be better than one you could have with an actual human, due to the information abundance of each machine, the potential is endless.

 

Question 2:

During the assembly of the circuits, we used many electronic components as inputs and outputs. Which of these components do you recognize in the circuit?

Inputs:      Pushbuttons, power, code

Outputs:    LED light, Buzzer

 

Question 3:

If you have 100000 LEDs of any brightness and color at your disposal, what would you make and where would you put it?

 

I am thinking of a wall covered by LEDs connected to motion sensors. It would be an art project, in which dancers will be performing in front of the wall and their shadows would be turned into light. I would prefer it not to have color, but only vary the lights’ intensity based on the melody’s tone (how upbeat or sad it sounds). Preferably I would like to put it in front of a large body of water (Maybe the Huangpu River, so on the Bund and by the water), so that the lights would contrast the darkness of the water

 

Question 4:

Which reflections about the nature of interaction can you make about the Figure I.1 in the Physical Computing reading?

 

As technologies advance so do our interactions with them, becoming increasingly multidimensional. The goal here is to make the computer as capable as possible in understanding our own natural language, body language and face expressions, instead of us having to learn how to communicate our message across, as is done today. The image is trying to highlight the single dimensional nature that human-computer interaction has traditionally had. The only medium for communication was/is the computer’s mouse, and maybe keyboard. The human version the computer understands is unable to speak, dance or move, not because we can’t, but because the computer has so far been unable to perceive that we can. But now it is time to change that. As humans have the incredible capacity to understand indirect messages the environment is sending at them, so will computers.